Watch the Pogo Stick online guitar lesson by Chris Buono from Funk Fission

Now that you made it through Buono Boot Camp, it’s time to get down! It is here we start to apply all the aforementioned techniques in order to play the riff ideas that lie ahead. From single note only riffs packed with percussive additives to riffs with sporadic harmony dropped in strategically hip junctures, these ultra-cool ideas will surely keep you on your toes as you learn how to apply all the techniques I’ve introduced.

Kicking things off is a riff I call Pogo Stick and it's one that is close to my heart as this is the riff that started it all. If you’re interested, here’s the story with a moral at to boot:

A good amount of what you see in this course emerged during my private teaching years, which started in 1993 while attending William Paterson College in northern New Jersey before it became a full-fledged university. After graduating WPC I eventually landed a teaching gig at a music store just getting on its feet on the Jersey Shore in Point Pleasant, NJ called Clarizio Music (it’s still there today!). The gig here was the half-hour grind where you had students of all ages and playing levels coming in and out at the top and middle of the hour. Those of you who teach understand you usually have a few minutes in between lessons throughout the day. Now, if you’re smart, you make the best of that time by turning it into some shed time for yourself. Within those random two-minute sessions I was shedding for my lessons with Wayne Krantz, David Fiuczynski, Vic Juris, and Gerry Carboy as well as developing and practicing material for my emerging gigs with underground New York city funk and R&B bands. Through all the amazing ideas and concepts I was being exposed to from every angle I was experimenting with everything: hybrid picking, advanced harmony, forward-thinking improvisational concepts, pushing the boundaries of 16th note funk rhythm playing, innovative whammy bar approaches, effects—it was an awesome time. At the same time I was also studying players both new and old. From Jimmy Nolen to John Frusciante, I was checkin’ everyone out and in those momentary sojourns I started putting my own pieces together. Pieces such as Wayne’s curled fingers and use of hybrid picking, Fuze’s penchant for reckless abandon and exploratory playing, Vic’s line construction ideas, and Gerry’s neck vision concepts and modal assignments—I was throwing it all in my own mix and before you know it …

Pogo Stick emerged and the rest is history.

Now the moral: Take whatever inspiring licks and riffs you learn and then turn them upside down, inside out and back. Make what you learn yours and run with it as far as you can. Many of these techniques were developing under my fingers before I even knew what they were and well before I knew who Scotty Mishoe or Reggie Wooten or Ben Lacy was. Take what I show you in this course and go crazy, explore, take chances! Just remember: Always do what’s best for the groove and the music at hand.