Watch the Club 54: 5 online guitar lesson by Chris Buono from Guitar Cubed

The comping rhythm here in Guitar 1 of Club 54 is absolutely the same as the rhythm employed in Sus Scrofa. What sets them apart is what’s played behind them; the style, the tempo, the chords--all of it. The thing to take away from what you have here is simply this: It's OK to take elements from one jam and inject them into another. In the end, when you’re doing this yourself if there’s any doubt just repeat this mantra to yourself: If it feels right, it is right.

When it comes to the voicings it’s all about stacked 4ths with a cherry 5th on top for the first and third chords. If you’re a Funk Fission owner then you know these chords well. If not, it goes like this...

Take a stock root position drop 2 m7 chord played on the middle strings--think "Listen to the Music" from the Doobies--and cut out the 5th that’s played on the 4th string. This leaves you with mostly fourths with the exception of the major 3rd on top. To nix that sound use your 4th finger to fret an octave above the b7 you’re holding on the 3rd string underneath your 1st finger bar. If this were the Fm7 chord, now an Fm7add4, it would be spelled F Bb Eb Ab Eb. See? All fourths with a cherry 5th on top. Man, that tastes good!

For the Dm11add4 it’s the same deal but since the chord is rooted from the 6th string that allows for another 5th to be played on top.

The Gb13 played in bar 4 is a little more involved. With the bass playing a C in its slap/pop-ified line it makes you wonder what the heck is this guy doing? Tritone substitution is what I’m doing. The interval between the bass line’s C and the root of the Gb13 is a tritone or more commonly known as a b5. This is a very cool sub that makes V chords in any instance have that outside altered sound without sounding so, well, out. Against a C root the Gb13 voicing we have here is spelled b5 b7 b13 b9 #9. Yikes! But, it sounds so good!