Watch the Transitions To Jazz online guitar lesson by David Becker from Transitions To Jazz

Hi, I'm David Becker and welcome to Transitions To Jazz.

Jazz is often thought of as extremely difficult and hard to transition to from other styles of music, but jazz (like rock) is actually rooted in the blues. Thus, there's a common thread that will help blues and rock players make an easy transition to jazz; the thread that we'll examine in this course.

I've organized this course into three sections. In the first section, we'll explore the tri-tone, triads and various extensions of the dominant seventh chord. We'll explore ways to comp using two, three, and four note voicings, and I'll also introduce you to the standard 2-5-1 turnaround in the blues.

In the second section, we'll take a look at a concept I call "jazz dialects." We'll work on a variety of jazz applications for the pentatonic information you already possess, also incorporating chromatics and triads as well as rhythmic variations. We'll go over various approaches to comping and soloing over the standard 2-5-1 jazz progression, as well as changing keys with a classic bossa nova form.

Then in the final section of the course, we'll explore three performance studies where I'll demonstrate how to develop a solo based on all the concepts from this course. We'll start out with a jazz blues in G, continuing with a standard 2-5-1 progression which moves through 6 different keys. Lastly, we'll solo over a bossa nova progression in two keys which address the minor 2-5-1 AND major 2-5-1.

For each of the performance examples, I'll explain the various approaches and concepts I used. You'll also get standard notation, tab, and rhythm tracks to work with on your own. Remember, music is sound and a language; you have to hear it to understand it. The more audio references you have, the easier it is to understand what sounds work where. So grab your guitar and let's get swingin'!