Watch the Another Outlaw online guitar lesson by Ladd Smith from Modern Nashville Guitar

Check out that Keith Banjo-Tuner on the low E string, that thing really comes in handy on stage. The Drop-D tuning is a very popular thing to use on Outlaw music, again this goes back to it really being about those low frequencies. Another thing to take note historically is that this whole thing came out of Texas, some out of Tulsa also, but mostly Lubbock and Austin. A lot of guitarists you might not associate with Waylon and Willie, people like Stevie Ray Vaughan (whom I mention in this breakdown) and Billy Gibbons played a lot of the same clubs, festivals and package shows with them and were actually close friends and advocates of the 'Outlaw Movement'. Outlaw Music seemed to cross all genres at the time. What really amazed Willie Nelson about the whole thing was that for the first time in history, there was a cross pollenated audience of Hippies, Bikers, Cowboys and Rednecks. It's also a music that broke down barriers of social class, race and age segregation. Notice, that there's a lot of strumming going on here with articulation on certain strings, this can take some practice to get in and stay in the pocket with. A lot of what happens with this style of guitar playing is behind the 3rd and 4th frets, there are a lot of open string pull-offs and hammer-ons. The cool thing about this style is that it's also very affective on an acoustic, it actually sounds very delta-blues-like on an acoustic. Be creative!