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Watch the Perfect Fourth online guitar lesson by Kai Eckhardt from Atomic Bass: Reactive Intervals

Welcome to the world of the perfect fourth. Just think of the wedding song "Here Comes the Bride". That is a perfect fourth. The term perfect applies only to the fourths and to the fifths. All the other intervals are labeled major and minor. This irregularity simply needs to be memorized as it is universal language in traditional harmony. You will also notice that this exercise goes across three strings only and has a perfect fifth built into it after the third note. Most of the larger intervals make use of their inversions, which allows the exercise to remain playable in the least complicated way. If you were to keep stacking fourths, you would soon run out of space and out of range because this exercise cycles through all 12 notes before it returns to the root. Each interval behaves differently in that sense and you will become acquainted with that fact more later on. The cycle of fourths and fifths (going up in fourths covers the same notes as going down in fifths) is a popular harmonic device used a lot in various forms of shedding. Here you become acquainted with it for the first time. The fingering makes use of barring across multiple strings and takes some getting used to at first. The sound is very angular and beautifully obscure. Tonal centers this time are C, Bb and Ab (moving around in whole tones).

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