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Watch the Open Tunings online guitar lesson by Vicki Genfan from Acoustic Rhythm Survival Guide

Here's the open G tuning that we'll be using in this segment. Use your tuner!

From low (6th string) to high (1st string):

E – down a whole step to D
A – down a whole step to G
D- stays the same
G – stays the same
B – stays the same
E – down a whole step to D

NOTE about tuners: There are many, many tuners on the market. If you already have one, it should be easy to read and respond quickly when you play the string. Be sure you play the string with a reasonable amount of volume and clarity to get the best response. I often times will play the 12th fret harmonic in order to tune.

I find that it gives a bit more vibration to the tuner and the sustain is a little longer. Personally, I use a tuner on the floor for live gigs, and I also use a clip on tuner for times when I'm not on stage or even on stage when I don't want to 'mute' my sound in order to tune (most of you will want to mute when you tune, but I like to let the audience hear the process, since I change tunings so frequently!).

Be sure you find the dominant 7 forms. Feel free to use them or not – it's totally up to you when you want to use the 'straight' major chord and when you want the dom 7 feel.

FOR THE MORE ADVANCED PLAYERS: If you're used to playing altered chords in a blues progression, fool around and see if you can 'find' some of those notes in the open tuning!

NOTE about Keys: Remember that you can use a capo to change the key and still use these same chord forms. For the key of 'A' you would use the capo on the 2nd fret, for B - the 4th fret, for C – the 5th fret, etc.

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