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  1. #1
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    Default Fretboard Epiphanies - The Blog

    Hey folks! I have not done one of these for awhile so I thought I would get back into it with Joe Dalton's: Fretboard Epiphanies.

    Joe has always been one of my favorite instructors, seems like a guy I could have a beer with and just be comfortable around (shoes optional). This course had me curious as well. I started out with "Big Twang" right when it came out and was quickly over my head. That was around 3 or more years ago and I'm a bit better (thanks to TF) now I think. Before I get back to Big Twang I thought I'd warm up with this one. When I am done here I will start "New World Flamenco" but that needs to be on sale a bit longer and I want to give my new acoustic a work out.

    When I start a course I like to introduce the instructor. I will also give him an invite to drop in if he/she has time. So without further ado.....

    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  2. #2
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    Joe Dalton



    When country guitar master Joe Dalton picks up a six-string; everyone listens. A phenomenon that has followed Joe since he was a snot nosed kid in the 5th grade. Having picked up his first instrument at age 5, Dalton should have been considered a musical prodigy if it weren’t for the plain fact that he was only one of the latest branches to sprout from a very musical family tree with a legacy that spans decades. His great-grandfather conducted the City of Rome Orchestra in Italy; his grandfather was the leader of the New York Philharmonic; his father is solely responsible for bringing mallets into the U.S. Army Band Corps; his brother teaches at the Boston Conservatory...we could go on, but you get the point, right? Musical prowess runs through his veins; it’s the nucleus of his existence.



    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  3. #3
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    Aria Guitars endorsee

    Name: Joe Dalton
    Model Used: Electric Guitars/ Aria-615

    Joe Dalton is one of the most in-demand session guitarists and music educators in the country today.

    615-Frontier

    Vintage Look and Traditional Sound.
    specs
    Body: Alder
    Neck: Maple, Bolt-on
    Fingerboard: Rosewood
    Number of Frets: 22
    Scale Length: 648mm (25-1/2inches)
    Pickups: CS-1 Single Coil, OS-1 Single Coil
    Controls: Volume x 1, Tone x 1, 3-position PU Selector Switch
    Tailpiece: VTL-1
    Hardware: Chrome
    Finishes: Ivory (IV), 3 Tone Sunburst (3TS), Black (BK), Candy Apple Red (CA)

    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  4. #4
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    Wow....here is something I didn't know....Joe was one of Arlen Roth's students. Check out this video which also has a real nice duet with Joe and his wife on sax.


    (can't find part 1 of the interview)


    Here's an early video of Joe produced by Arlen Roth



    Okay, if you've watched these videos you can see Joe approaches his playing with precision and finesse. I expect no less in this course
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  5. #5
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    Lesson 1, a little practical theory on the guitar.

    The E major scale as demonstrated on the high E string.

    3 things from this lesson:
    1) a major scale basic formula = WWHWWWH
    W = Whole step or 2 frets
    H = half step or 1 fret
    So.......
    Notes: E -- F# -- G# -- A -- B -- C# -- D# -- E
    Frets: open -- 2nd -- 4th -- 5th -- 7th -- 9th -- 11th -- 12

    2) When playing guitar the fewer the movements you make the better. AS you travel up the fret board, don't chase frets, shift positions. This is clear on the video.

    3) This is a triplet rhythm, consistent and even.

    enjoy!
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  6. #6

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    Nice start, I see you've got some energy to start the new year with. I'll have to consider the 'Country Joe Dalton' nickname. Doesn't quite seem right what with Joe Dalton being from New Jersey I think. Like that Bon Jovi guy singing western themed songs, it's not quite the image I have in mind for Jersey folks.
    Enjoy Your Karma, after all you earned it.
    “Atheism is a non-prophet organization.” -George Carlin

    email: gadlaw@gmail.com - http://www.facebook.com/gadlaw

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    I'm a Joe Dalton fan as well and will be following along with you. Great start!
    ----------------------------------
    Stay tuned

    Chris

  8. #8

    Talking Love Joe Dalton!

    And, Gadlaw, New Jersey is part of our country. I was in the army there once a long time ago. It's ok.
    Studying in Jeff Beasley's Sherpa Class, Shred Warehouse! Alumni of Steve Lasner's Bar Room Blues Workshop! Proverbs 17:22 says "A cheerful heart is good medicine..." So I must be overdosing. "I am slowly puttering along the way to becoming the world's most average guitar player."

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by wvgman View Post
    And, Gadlaw, New Jersey is part of our country. I was in the army there once a long time ago. It's ok.
    It's where Brad and Red and Joe are from and I've been there many times with many fine and beautiful people and places but it's not the west or mid west. Plus it looks best in a wide shot.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Enjoy Your Karma, after all you earned it.
    “Atheism is a non-prophet organization.” -George Carlin

    email: gadlaw@gmail.com - http://www.facebook.com/gadlaw

  10. #10

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    I actually just started this lesson a week ago. I agree. I like Joe's style, and this is a good theory refresher, and you learn some good fingerstyle patterns. After I finish, I will be looking for more from Joe. And, that Aria looks really cool....

  11. #11

    Talking Just checking in.

    Hello Everyone,
    I really do follow the forum and check it daily. I recently missed quite a few comments under Artists and Educators about the new 50 Acoustic Blues Licks course . Sorry about that. I'll try to follow closely and I'll be happy to answer any questions.
    Also, I may be taking on a few students in the Sherpa format soon and also may be setting up a few live performances in the New Jersey area shortly.
    I regularly teach at St. John Vianney high school in Holmdel, NJ and I'm the music minister at St. Pius Church in Forked River, NJ. I'm a single dad with 2 gorgeous girls 7 and 10 years old. These jobs keep me at home with the family where I'm needed most. I love it.
    I do have some new cds on the way.
    Maybe, I should set up a concert with an afternoon clinic or master class. Let me know if there is interest and maybe we can make that happen. As the schedule permits, I could even take the show on the road, especially during the summer.
    It is always great to hear from everyone. Thanks again for the kind words and support.

  12. #12
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    WooooHoooo.....Joe is in da house baby! Guess I will have to get on my horse as soon as the hangover fades I feel blessed, Truefire really has some great people they have chosen to work with and we, as students, reap the rewards!!!
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  13. #13
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    Lesson #2 Diatonic

    Man there is a world of theory in these few paragraphs. The purpose of this course however is not to teach advanced theory....it's to make you think more than anything else (IMHO).

    So what are the key points? The whole write-up!!!!!

    "The chords that result from any major scale are:

    Major
    Minor
    Minor
    Major
    Major
    Minor
    Diminished


    The first triad (3 note chord) uses the 1st, 3rd, and fifth notes of the scale. This chord is major. The second triad uses the 2nd, 4th, and 6th notes of the scale. This chord is minor. A major triad has two steps between the first two notes and a step and a half between the next two notes. A minor triad has a step and a half between the first two notes and two steps between the next two notes.

    The 1st note is known as the root of the triad. Every triad has a root third and fifth. If the triad is built on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th etc. scale degree, we still refer to the first note as the root. Another way to look at the construction of chords is by intervals.

    An Interval is the distance between the notes. Always count the note you are starting with. The distance between A and C is a third.

    A major third is 2 steps.
    A minor third is 1½ steps.
    A major triad is a major 3rd with a minor 3rd on top.
    A minor triad is a minor 3rd with a major 3rd on top.
    A diminished triad is a minor 3rd with a minor 3rd on top.


    This makes the length of the triad shorter (only 3 steps), hence the name diminished. (made smaller) The remaining triad does not occur in a major scale. The augmented triad is a major 3rd with a major 3rd on top. So this triad is longer. Augmented - made bigger."



    This is Mandatory Memorize stuff, que pasa!
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 01-22-2012 at 09:11 AM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Now consider Joe's movement up the neck in playing these chords....great for a demonstration but what I need to know is chord shapes for the positions. Theory is nice but practical application tells you....first lesson....

    MINIMIZE movement!

    Now here is an Excellent tool for finding chord variations up the neck.

    http://guitarchords.fm/

    I was going to put in a bunch of chord symbols on the page but I found this great little resource. I don't want to waste time making chord charts on Neck Diagrams, saving them to flicker then uploading them here (is there a faster way?). At home I use one of those little chord stampers and make my own.



    or

    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Very nice summary, well said Wolf ... and Joe...
    ----------------------------------
    Stay tuned

    Chris

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    Well, I drew up chord charts as I mentioned and will practice them for awhile while incorporating the next 3 lessons. Joe is just focusing on the first set of chords he showed starting at Emajor at the nut and moving up to the D#diminished on the 11th.

    I am better at picking arpeggios then I am at finding some of these chord shapes I diagrammed. Once I am comfortable with Joe's pattern I am going to swap in some different chord forms.
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 01-22-2012 at 01:35 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  17. #17
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    The 3 triad lessons....

    Definition...
    Inversion: a chord shape that does not have it's root note as the lowest note.

    Okay somebody correct me if I am wrong here but this is what I got.

    Major chord = R + 3rd + 5th
    1st inversion = 3rd + 5th + R or 3rd + R + 5th
    2nd inversion = 5th + R + 3rd or 5th + 3rd + R

    The key note seems to be the lowest note. Is the order that follows relevant?
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  18. #18
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    Here's what I did. I actually had to pick up my guitar a few times to figure out the root notes. Good exercise unto itself....





    I threw in the 7ths and minor 7ths as well, there are some forms I really need to commit to memory.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  19. #19
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    On these lessons Joe talks about using the E string as a bass for all the second inversion arpeggios. Sounds pretty cool. I think the more you can incorporate open strings into your acoustic playing the better it sounds.

    He also mentions a couple of songs the first one that "has that 50s feel" is I believe "Unchained Melody buy "The Righteous Brothers" (what a name).



    Oh, my love
    my darling
    I've hungered for your touch
    a long lonely time
    and time goes by so slowly
    and time can do so much
    are you still mine?
    I need your love
    I need your love
    Godspeed your love to me

    Lonely rivers flow to the sea,
    to the sea
    to the open arms of the sea
    lonely rivers sigh 'wait for me, wait for me'
    I'll be coming home wait for me

    Oh, my love
    my darling
    I've hungered for your touch
    a long lonely time
    and time goes by so slowly
    and time can do so much
    are you still mine?
    I need your love
    I need your love
    Godspeed your love to me



    http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/r/ri...y_ver2_tab.htm

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Unchained Melody - The righteous brothers
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Tuning: Standard

    Keep a even beat and try to let the B string ring. And sing!
    Verses
    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-----------1-----------1-----------1-----------1-----------1-------|
    G|-----0---0-------0---0-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2-----|
    D|---2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---3-------3---3-------3---|
    A|-3-----------3-----------0-----------0-----------3-----------3-------------|
    E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|

    Ohhh .. My Love... My Darling..
    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|--------3------------3-------------1-----------1-----------1-----------1---|
    G|------0---0--------0---0---------0---0-------0---0-------2---2-------2-----|
    D|----0-------0----0-------0-----2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2-------|
    A|----------------------------3------------3----------0------------0---------|
    E|-3-------------3-----------------------------------------------------------|
    I've hungered for your touch... A long..

    e|-------3----------3--------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-----3---3------3---3------------------------------------------------------|
    G|---0----------0-------0----------------------------------------------------|
    D|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    A|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    E|-3---------3---------------------------------------------------------------|
    Lonely time..


    Bridge
    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-----------1------------3------------3-----------------------------|
    G|-----0---0-------0---0--------0---0--------0---0---------------------------|
    D|---2-------2---2-------2----0-------0----0-------0-------------------------|
    A|-3-----------3-------------------------------------------------------------|
    E|--------------------------3------------3-----------------------------------|
    I need.. Your love..

    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-----------1-----------0-----------0-------------------------------|
    G|-----2---2-------2---2-------0---0-------0---0-----------------------------|
    D|---2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---------------------------|
    A|-0-----------0-----------2-----------2-------------------------------------|
    E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    I need.. Your love

    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-------------3------------1-----------1-----------1-----------1----|
    G|-----2---2---------0---0--------0---0-------0---0-------3---3-------3---3--|
    D|---3-------3-----0-------0----2-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2-------2|
    A|-3--------------------------3-----------3-----------3-----------3----------|
    E|--------------3------------------------------------------------------------|
    God speed your love.. to me..

    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-----------3-------------1------------8----------------------------|
    G|-----2---2-------0---0---------2---2--------8---8--------------------------|
    D|---3-------3---0-------0-----3-------3----8-------8------------------------|
    A|-3-------------------------3------------6----------------------------------|
    E|-------------3-------------------------------------------------------------|
    Lonely rivers flow to the sea.. to the sea
    X 2
    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-----------3------------1--------------1---------------------------|
    G|-----2---2-------0---0--------0---0----------0---0-------------------------|
    D|---3-------3---0-------0----2-------2------2-------2-----------------------|
    A|-3------------------------3-----------3--3---------------------------------|
    E|-------------3-------------------------------------------------------------|
    To the open arms of the sea

    Ending
    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|---------1------------3-----------1-----------1-----------1-----------1----|
    G|-------2---2--------0---0-------0---0-------2---2-------2---2-------2---2--|
    D|-----3-------3----0-------0---2-------2---2-------2---3-------3---3-------3|
    A|---3------------------------3-----------0-----------3-----------3----------|
    E|----------------3----------------------------------------------------------|
    God Speed your love to me
    e|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    B|-------1-----------1---------1-----------=---------------------------------|
    G|-----1---1-------1---1-------0---------------------------------------------|
    D|---3-------3---3-------3-----2---------------------------------------------|
    A|-3-----------3---------------3---------------------------------------------|
    E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|
    (Softly end with C)

    A beautiful easy to play song for that special someone. Full credit to John Leadman for
    the chords. I just figured out the picking pattern and tried to make life easier especially
    for people starting out. A wave to all singaporeans out there.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  20. #20
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    The other one Joe mentioned was "Melissa" by the Allman Brothers.
    This song is pretty darn close to exactly what Joe's covered in the last couple of lessons!





    Now that you know it here's a version to watch and play along




    and just for completeness....possibly the best lesson

    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  21. #21
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    Drone Lessons:

    How many food products are there aimed at kids that say something like "kids will love it.....and it's good for them too!" It's like....ha parents, here's your chance to put one over on your kids. That's Joe in this first Drone lesson.

    It sounds good
    It uses the same easy chords you've been working with but....

    We are also learning chord theory, sixths, finger-style patterns etc. A whole realm of stuff and your just moving a few chords up and down the neck. "Sounds good and good for you too!"

    There are several lessons throughout Truefire's catalog that cover working with 6ths, it's a great sound and technique to pick up on.

    Chris Buono mentions them in his 50 Rock Guitar Licks Course.
    http://truefire.com/tftv/?channel=50...h_query=sixths (might not be accessible to all).



    His write-up:
    "When you get down to it, every interval has it's own intrinsic role to play. For instance, could you imagine playing a tune's worth of 2nds where power chords (5ths) were intended to be? Or playing "Smoke on the Water" with 3rds instead of 4ths? The same holds true for those classic sounding sliding 6th licks. In the vein Steve Cropper, who may just be able to patent this interval, this lick not only makes use of major sixths, but introduces an often overlooked and under appreciated component: space."

    As he mentions....Steve Cropper got famous playing 6ths!


    Blues Brothers
    Live at the RR Convention, LA, 1979
    Jake Blues-Lead vocals
    Elwood Blues-Vocals and Harmonica
    Steve Cropper-Guitar
    Matt Murphy-Guitar
    Donald Dunn-Bass
    Steve Jordan-Drums
    Paul Shaffer-Keyboards
    Lou Marini-Sax
    Tom Malone-Trombone and Sax
    Alan Rubin-Trumpet
    Tom Scott-Sax
    (heluva a band!)



    Here's a nice lesson!
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 02-07-2012 at 01:00 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    An early live version just for fun:



    Sam & Dave were an American soul and rhythm and blues (R&B) duo who performed together from 1961 through 1981. The tenor (higher) voice was Samuel David Moore (born Samuel David Hicks on October 12, 1935 in Winchester, Georgia), and the baritone/tenor (lower) voice was Dave Prater (May 9, 1937, Ocilla, Georgia -- April 9, 1988, Sycamore, Georgia).

    Sam & Dave are members of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, the Grammy Hall of Fame, the Vocal Group Hall of Fame, and are Grammy Award and multiple gold record award winning artists. According to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Sam & Dave were the most successful soul duo, and brought the sounds of the black gospel church to pop music with their call-and-response records. Recorded primarily at Stax Records in Memphis, Tennessee, from 1965 through 1968, these included "Soul Man", "Hold On, I'm Comin", "I Thank You", "When Something is Wrong with My Baby", "Wrap It Up", and many other Southern Soul classics. Other than Aretha Franklin, no soul act during Sam & Dave's Stax years (1965--1968) had more consistent R&B chart success, including 10 consecutive top 20 singles and 3 consecutive top 10 LPs. Their crossover charts appeal (13 straight appearances and 2 top 10 singles) helped to pave the way for the acceptance of soul music by white pop audiences, and their song "Soul Man" was one of the first songs by a black group to top the pop charts using the word "soul", helping define the genre "Soul Music". "Soul Man" was a number one Pop Hit (Cashbox: November 11, 1967) and has been recognized as one of the most influential songs of the past 50 years by the Grammy Hall of Fame, The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Rolling Stone magazine, and RIAA Songs of the Century. "Soul Man" was featured as the soundtrack and title for a 1986 film and also a 1997--1998 television series, and Soul Men was a 2008 feature film.

    Nicknamed "Double Dynamite", "The Sultans of Sweat", and "The Dynamic Duo" for their sweaty, gritty, gospel-infused performances, Sam & Dave were one of the greatest live acts of the 1960s. They were an influence on many future musicians, including Bruce Springsteen, Al Green, Tom Petty, Phil Collins, Michael Jackson, Elvis Costello, Teddy Pendergrass, Billy Joel and Stevie Winwood. The Blues Brothers, who helped create a resurgence of popularity for soul, R&B, and blues in the 1980s, were influenced by Sam & Dave - their biggest hit was a cover of "Soul Man", and their act and stage show had many similarities to the duo.
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 02-07-2012 at 01:01 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  23. #23
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    Jeff McErlain also hit's "sliding 6ths" in his course:



    Here is the lesson:
    http://truefire.com/tftv/?channel=50...h_query=sixths (again might not be viewable)

    and here is Jeff's write-up:
    "The interval of the 6th is one of the most useful and common in blues. The cool thing about it and why it sounds so good is that it is an inverted 3rd. What? Let's look at it, a major 3rd above C is E, a major 6th above E is C. Pretty cool and extremely useful. I can't stress enough memorizing your 6ths on the fingerboard, they will provide you with plenty of mileage and increase your understanding of the guitar. So while you are at it, practice all your intervals!"

    Jeff and Chris are also great guys to learn from!
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Wolf,
    I glad you're giving Joe's great course the Wolfboy blog treatment it deserves. Tev77 and I started a blog back almost 2 years ago when the course first came out. Sadly we have both been sidetracked by "life". The first 2 dozen or so lessons, are just a fantastic into to fingerstyle. I was a lot slower going through this course because fingerpicking is pretty new to me. So I used the into lesson parts of this to go slowly and work on perfecting technique.

    I will be watching your blog closely, but I have made a commitment to myself to work on and finish a lesson from Blues Alchemy, so I will not be joining you on this blog.
    Honey, I'm spending money on guitars or women, ... your choice.

    If you take Satan for a ride, pretty soon he'll want to drive.


    Favorite Course - Blues Alchemy
    Working On - Fretboard Epiphanies & Jump Blues

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    Thanks for the kind words rj!

    I already have a leg up on finger-style but am enjoying the simple way Joe ties so much stuff together. Plus....I do meander a bit
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    The second E major drone lesson.

    Another little epiphany about drone strings. Both the high E and B strings can be used as open and sound Great with a variety of chords. This is also quite clear in the New World Flamenco course. Many of us are so used to making full chords we often forget to experiment with open strings. Listen to how nice the continuous low E bass note fits in as well.

    My favorite spot is where he plays off the D# against the open high E. It really sounds nice in an arppagiated pattern.

    Something to think about using the open A string as a droning bass when playing in the Key of A, same with D.

    Think about what key you are in and does that key have a natural E or B in it's scale then use the higher strings as open drones.

    Remember this from earlier:

    Major
    Minor
    Minor
    Major
    Major
    Minor
    Diminished

    Try moving up the neck using an open high E playing
    Cmaj
    Dmin
    Emin
    Fmaj
    Gmaj
    Amin
    Bdim
    Cmaj
    and whatever other variations you can think of!

    Some sound great, others not so much
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Bass Notes or pedal tones lesson.

    Is this a cool lesson or what!!!!
    I am going to be playing around with this one for awhile.

    Joe is taking the G#min chord with a droning high E chord and the playing the Emajor scale on the bass strings. Of course Joe refers to it as a B chord I think, either one is okay G#min is the relative minor to B so it all works.

    This is truly the start of finger-style guitar.

    I looked at Joe's .pdf file on this and it sounds and plays pretty nice. I have another suggestion

    Try walking the bass line up than back down with your right thumb.
    E-F#-G#-A-B-C#-D#-E-D#-C#-B-A-G#-F#-E
    Low E - A string - D string

    The D# and E are a bit tougher to get to so you might want to go back and forth only up to the C#.
    Start
    E - 2 - 3 - 4/F# - 2 - 3 - 4/G# - 2 - 3 - 4 etc. then
    I was using p-3-2-1 pattern

    E - 2 - F# - 4/G# - 2 - A - 4/B - 2 - C# - 4 etc. then
    This I use a triplet feel pattern p-3-1, p-3-1,

    E - F# - G# - A/B - C# - B - A /G# - F# - E - E
    Try this 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and like p 321- p 321- p 321 - p 321
    Where you pluck the 321 in unison on the G, B and high E strings
    Thumb-321, thumb-321, thumb-321, thumb-321
    1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and

    All kinds of stuff here to try, I think the key is getting to work your thumb separately from your fingers is the heart of finger-style.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    A quick nod to Eddie and I am out of here!

    One of their best





    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Low E string drone lesson.

    Sounds great. Hard part (for me) is the string skipping with the thumb. Naturally I just want to hit the A string after the low E not skip over to the D. That's why I practice.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    "A" string drone lesson

    Just like the last but using the A string as the bass. Joe strums this more than picks it however, the same pattern from the last lesson works here as well and...no thumb skipping! Has a different feel to it, a little more upbeat maybe?
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    At this point Joe suggests taking stock of all the sounds and techniques he's covered so far and put something together on your own. If you do this consider posting what you come up with....I might have to record something this weekend, if it sounds okay I will post it.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Major scales lesson

    Another simple lesson that is also quite complex when you think about it

    Doing the WWHWWWH for each string is brilliant and something, despite years of playing, I never even thought about. It will be the same frets on every string:
    Open, 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 11, 12

    So take the "A" string as Joe uses, the key of A has 3 sharps ###



    If you are unfamiliar with reading music
    Sharps are represented by #
    Flats are represented by b as in this depiction of an Eb major scale



    these two symbols ( # and b) are called accidentals


    An accidental is a symbol that turns a note into a sharp, a flat, or a natural:


    Sharp (♯): Makes a note higher in pitch by a half step.

    Flat (♭): Makes a note lower in pitch by a half step.

    Natural (♮): Returns a note to its original pitch after having been sharpened or flattened. Naturals also cancel out sharps or flats implied by a key signature.
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 01-25-2012 at 08:59 AM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Now consider the notes you fret when you walk up the "A" string.

    open = A
    W
    2nd = B
    W
    4th = C#
    H
    5th = D
    W
    7th = E
    W
    9th = F#
    W
    11th = G#
    H
    12th = A

    So the key of A should have 3 sharps (C#, F#, G#) and thus 3 accidentals...

    Voila


    If you can read music this is kind of basic stuff but still it is neat how it all fits.

    On a staff of music the 5 lines, bottom to top are with a menomic to remember
    E Every
    G Good
    B Boy
    D Does
    F Fine

    While the spaces from bottom to top are:
    F
    A
    C
    E

    The accidentals are placed at the beginning of the staff after the treble cleff and before the time signature on the line corresponding to the altered note. So here's how it actually looks:

    F-------
    E
    D------
    C
    B------
    A
    G------
    F
    E------


    F #------
    E
    D------
    C #
    B------
    A
    G------
    F
    E------

    Now the space above would naturally be a G so the third accidental is place in the space on top of the staff like so:


    G #
    F #------
    E
    D------
    C #
    B------
    A
    G------
    F
    E------

    And the same with the D string and the key of D

    open = D
    W
    2nd = E
    W
    4th = F#
    H
    5th = G
    W
    7th = A
    W
    9th = B
    W
    11th = C#
    H
    12th = D



    "excetera, excetera, excetera"

    (Anna and the King of Siam reference )
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 01-25-2012 at 09:00 AM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Diatonic Chords in "A" lesson

    Here we go again up the neck with the A major chord progression.

    open = A major
    W
    2nd = B minor
    W
    4th = C# minor
    H
    5th = D major
    W
    7th = E major
    W
    9th = F# minor
    W
    11th = G# diminished
    H
    12th = A major

    Joe mentions briefly the key to all of blues and rock very briefly....
    The I IV V progression

    He quickly demonstrated 3 songs, for some reason my mind is blank to the first one but the second was Good Love then Hang On Sloopy. You could add half the Stones catalog and most of the blues etc.

    Playing the blues you tend to use 7th chords instead of major chords as in
    I --- IV --- V
    A7 - D7 --E7 or
    E7 - A7 --B7

    That is something different than what Joe is covering at the moment but again it's just a little thing he mentions that you can really expand upon.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    "A" Major Diatonic Triad lessons

    Both of these lessons are similar in nature to what was covered with the "E" major progression but with different picking patterns. In the second lesson Joe uses two example songs. The second one is a Christmas tune called "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen."

    The first is a very famous classical piece. It goes by 2 different names:
    Leyenda or Asturias by Issac Albeinz
    actual name is" No. 5 Asturias (Leyenda) from Suite española, Op. 47"

    The master:


    John Williams in the Alhambra (I think that's where he's playing) at a faster pace.


    This is my favorite classical piece of all time.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    "A" Major Drone Lesson 1

    Nothing new and different at first but then we hit upon a couple of things:
    1) Carulli Etudes
    2) Intervals
    3) major third vs minor third

    I think Ferdinado Carulli's Etudes are all in the public domain now, here are some free ones
    http://www.8notes.com/carulli.asp

    Here is a link with Leyenda (Asturias)
    http://www.score-on-line.com/freesco...lection=guitar

    Some history:
    http://www.stanleyyates.com/articles...z/leyenda.html

    Play along version:
    http://www.songsterr.com/a/wsa/isaac...r-tab-s23643t0

    Here is a great link for a copy of Carulli's Etude #4 and an .mp3 to here it for reference.
    http://www.free-scores.com/download-...c.php?pdf=2262
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 02-07-2012 at 01:16 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Here is a great lesson on just intervals:
    http://www.theguitarsuite.com/Theory/Intervals.html

    What is an interval?

    An interval is simply the distance between 2 notes.

    The root note (note 1 of a scale) is the note you start on ...for example in the key of A it would be the A note on the 6th string/5th fret.
    There are 7 general intervals:
    2nd
    3rd
    4th
    tritone
    5th
    6th
    7th
    (there are also unison and octave)

    This may help understand a little better.

    Look at one string of the guitar, you have 12 frets, and that equals an octave between the first fret and the last fret.

    Distance between Notes - Interval
    1 fret----------- minor 2nd
    2 frets---------- major 2nd
    3 frets---------- minor 3rd
    4 frets---------- major 3rd
    5 frets---------- perfect fourth (no minor or major of this)
    6 frets---------- tritone (tense and dissonant sounding)
    7 frets---------- perfect 5th (no minor or major of this either)
    8 frets---------- minor 6th
    9 frets---------- major 6th
    10 frets-------- minor 7th
    11 frets-------- major 7th
    12 frets-------- octave


    So if you look at the charts below, you'll see the root note (the note you start on) and you'll see the major, minor or perfect interval being illustrated. For example the first chart shows the 2nd interval. The root note is in tan. Count 1 fret up on the same string and you see that the black note (the minor 2nd) is right there. Count 2 frets up and the blue note (the major 2nd) is right there. From there you can see where these same notes are on all of the other strings.

    Another example would be the 5th interval. This is a perfect interval because there are no minor or major notes for it, it's all by itself because it's perfect. Look at its chart. In this example the root note is an A on the 6th string, count up 7 frets and you see the perfect interval on the 12th fret. So the perfect 5th of an A is E ... A B C D E




    Tips for learning guitar intervals:

    Practice playing the notes on the fretboard and try to learn how the location of each interval relates to its root note.

    Some key terms and concepts:


    Consonance:
    This refers to when an interval is more harmonious. Or there doesn't seem to be much friction in their relationship aurally. They feel stable.
    Consonant Intervals:

    Octave (perfect consonance) can only be perfect, augmented or diminished Fifth (perfect consonance)
    Fourth (perfect consonance)
    Major Third (imperfect consonance)
    Minor Third (imperfect consonance)
    Minor Sixth (imperfect consonance)
    Major Sixth (imperfect consonance)

    Dissonance:
    This refers to when an interval in not very harmonious. There seems to be friction or the notes sounding together sound unstable. Dissonant intervals feel like they need to go somewhere. When they go to a major tone or chord this is called resolution.
    Dissonant Intervals:the Tritone

    (major, minor, augmented or diminished) Minor Second
    Major Second
    Minor Seventh
    major Seventh

    There is more at the link above but this is as deep as I need to go. If you want to know about inverted intervals etc. go to the link
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Major Third vs Minor Third

    The difference is....1 fret (see above)

    It's just another interval but as you already know there is a huge difference between the feel/sound of a major chord vs a minor one. What you are doing is dropping the third of the chord one fret.



    A - Bb, 1 fret----------- minor 2nd
    A - B, 2 frets---------- major 2nd
    A - C, 3frets---------- minor 3rd
    A - C#, 4 frets---------- major 3rd

    So....lowering the C# (major 3rd) 1 fret to a C (minor 3rd) yields A minor chord


    and with that I will say "goodnight."
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Ooops, I forgot to add a plug for Truefire:

    There are lessons involving thirds in the following courses and probably many others....







    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    "A" Major Drone lesson #2

    Another pattern to work on, this course should really get your right hand spatially aware!
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    "A" Major Drone lesson #3

    Listen, enjoy and practice....apparently there is some pay-off later
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Melody in "A" Lesson

    You know a pro can always make things look so simple. This is the first lesson that really combines:
    1) Chords
    2) Scales and
    3) Picking patterns

    All what we've been working on....to derive a song.

    Think for a minute....if you would have heard Joe's song, just heard it, without going through these lessons it would have sounded far mre complex than you now know it to be! You know some basic theory behind the note and chord choices as well. Now many players here know this stuff but to those that don't I think it's quite an eye opener.

    I am looking forward to the rest of the course but that is probably it for tonight, I want to go work on this......
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Melody in "E" Lesson

    Very similar to the last lesson using the chords Joe started out with in the key of "E."

    So using the notes,
    Notes: E -- F# -- G# -- A -- B -- C# -- D# -- E

    The frets,
    open -- 2nd -- 4th -- 5th -- 7th -- 9th -- 11th -- 12

    and chords,
    E - Major
    F# - Minor
    G# - Minor
    A - Major
    B - Major
    C# - Minor
    D# - Diminished
    E -Major

    Joe makes a beautiful melody/song arrangement seem easy again.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Laura's Song Performance Lesson

    Well here I am cruising along in this blog thinking it ain't to difficult for an accomplished beginner (it's not) then along comes Laura's song. I'm going to work on it a bit then watch the breakdown and work on it some more and report back....looks like an intermediate piece.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  45. #45

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    I'm a huge fan of Joe D's Fretboard Epiphanies too Wolf. He has a way with mixing in sound music theory along with practical playing ideas. I've read through Laura's Song a few times and definitely think it's doable for you. I think the better you get to know the earlier lessons really strongly, like going back over them even when you've moved on to other stuff is always a good idea. Build those foundations and everything becomes easier. Laura's Song is a great tune and a great goal.
    The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled. -- Plutarch

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    Thanks Herby for chiming in! I was wondering if anyone was out there

    I ran through it a bit last night and it is doable. The thing I have to do is listen to Joe play it while I'm working on it. Finger-style and ragtime, for me, pose a rhythmic challenge for sight reading. I can't get the feel of the rhythm without hearing it first. Have you ever played any ragtime guitar? I just got a nice version of Joplin's "The entertainer" that I want to learn.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  47. #47
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    Wolfboy,
    I am following along, you have already covered about as much as I've been able to get through. Like you said Joe makes it all look so easy, and if you work through the exercises it really isn't very difficult.

    Here is something I put together based on this course. It's not fingerstyle, but does use open strings and the scale/key information as Joe presents it.

    Honey, I'm spending money on guitars or women, ... your choice.

    If you take Satan for a ride, pretty soon he'll want to drive.


    Favorite Course - Blues Alchemy
    Working On - Fretboard Epiphanies & Jump Blues

  48. #48
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    That's great rj!

    I don't know which quote I liked the best

    "Kind of sounds like music"

    or

    "I got red light fever"



    There is the name for your song....Red Light Fever!
    (of course if you use that I get a writing credit on the album notes )

    Excellent!
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  49. #49
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    Well I've gotten through Laura's Song a couple of times now. You hold down "E" chords a lot in this tune. The one part that I keep have some issues with is the chord in measure #31. I make that using a barre on the second fret with my index finger. My third finger on 1st string 4th fret G# and my pinky on second string fifth fret. Then I always want to pick up my pinky instead of my third finger to play the first string F#. It's a coordination thing to work on.

    On to the breakdown.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  50. #50
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    One new concept Joe introduces in the breakdown is "artifical harmonics."

    Artificial Harmonics


    Artificial Harmonics are those that can be produced anywhere on the fretboard. Like Natural Harmonics, they also divide the string length into equal parts, which produce a bell like chime when the string is picked.

    In order to play an Artifical Harmonic you must finger a note on the fretboard, pushing the string right down to the fret ( for this example lets play the note A on the second fret on the third string ). Then lightly touch the string with your other hands index finger exactly 12 frets higher ( in our example we would lightly touch the third string above the 14th fret with our index finger). Then in order to produce the chime you must pick the string behind your index finger. This can be done by holding the pick between your thumb and middle finger, or just using your thumb. As soon as the chime has sounded remove your index finger so you don't accidentally stop the harmonic from ringing.

    Using this method, any note can be played as a harmonic. This means that whole single note passages , or chord arpeggios can be played with the chime sound of the harmonic. Harmonics should be used sparingly though as too much of a good thing can spoil the effect.



    The possibilities for incorporating harmonics in your playing are endless. Once you have mastered them try playing all the notes in a chord, moving across the strings from low to high and back again, or for a heavier sound, use the whammy bar on an electric for another type of effect.
    http://johncomino.tripod.com/harmart.htm
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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