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  1. #1

    Default Chord Cookbook question

    I got the chord cook book and Matthew has a song called Seven Majors.
    It has 4-Major chords in the progression. I thought most scales only produced 3-major chords. Can someone explain the theory to me?
    Chris

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by caustin View Post
    I got the chord cook book and Matthew has a song called Seven Majors.
    It has 4-Major chords in the progression. I thought most scales only produced 3-major chords. Can someone explain the theory to me?
    Chris
    I'd like to know the answer to that question also.

  3. #3

    Red face Good question.

    Hi caustin and welcome to the forum! I am not familiar with the song you mentioned as I have not ventured very far into the Chord Cookbook, but you may want to post this question in Chris Buono's Theory Queries forum thread; here is a link to it. Chris loves the questions.
    http://truefire.com/forum/showthread...5157#post65157
    Studying in Jeff Beasley's Sherpa Class, Shred Warehouse! Alumni of Steve Lasner's Bar Room Blues Workshop! Proverbs 17:22 says "A cheerful heart is good medicine..." So I must be overdosing.Eph. 4:31,32 I need to remember this every day.

  4. #4

    Default

    HI caustin (heyguys!):

    This song is obviously in A (It is the last chord so there is no doubt this is the key of Matt's song). However when he changes from E to F you can hear a surprising change of key, this is a temporary change or modulation from A major to Aminor (F major and C maj don't belong to the key of A major, but to the key of A minor (or C major). Matt explains the modulation concept in other parts of Chord Cookbook. In this case he wanted to demosntrate the sound of the maj 7 chords (romantic and nostalgic).

    Hope this helps.

  5. #5

    Red face There it is!

    RGalvez is the "man" on Chord Cook book and Songwriting. He knows this stuff!
    Studying in Jeff Beasley's Sherpa Class, Shred Warehouse! Alumni of Steve Lasner's Bar Room Blues Workshop! Proverbs 17:22 says "A cheerful heart is good medicine..." So I must be overdosing.Eph. 4:31,32 I need to remember this every day.

  6. #6

    Default 3 major 3 minors

    Quote Originally Posted by caustin View Post
    I got the chord cook book and Matthew has a song called Seven Majors.
    It has 4-Major chords in the progression. I thought most scales only produced 3-major chords. Can someone explain the theory to me?
    Chris
    Yes but it is very common to change any minor to a major, usually I call this secondary dominate but that's just how I think hopefully you got a better answer .
    Peace

  7. #7

    Default Harmony

    He calls the harmony a name at the start of the course I can't understand his accent.
    sounds like tetra or church ary , I am hoping someone knows thanks.
    Steveo
    I don't see well so forgive may poor writing skills, I am half blind so I try and yeah it better than being deaf

  8. #8

    Default

    I'm not positive but I think he is saying "tertiary harmony" which is the harmony deriving from stacking alternate scale tones into chords.
    Then he goes on to describe chords variously. Chord Cookbook video Introduction Theory Part II, about 2:50 into that video.
    Hopefully someone will explain it further here in a bit.
    Enjoy Your Karma, after all you earned it.
    email: gadlaw@gmail.com
    http://www.facebook.com/gadlaw

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default

    Gad I'm with you on this... I think he's saying tertiary... built from intervals of thirds. Stacking minor and major thirds to construct minor and major chords. This is standard or conventional chord construction, as opposed to quartal harmony where chords are built from intervals of 4ths.
    ----------------------------------
    Stay tuned

    Chris

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gadlaw View Post
    I'm not positive but I think he is saying "tertiary harmony" which is the harmony deriving from stacking alternate scale tones into chords.
    Then he goes on to describe chords variously. Chord Cookbook video Introduction Theory Part II, about 2:50 into that video.
    Hopefully someone will explain it further here in a bit.
    Thanks gad
    I am not far into the course but so far I know must of it, Well I learned some of it and have been studying the stuff again.
    Tertian is the word Tertianary seems right.
    I purchased the songwriters bundle so far pretty sad not one of these course's mention the natural flow or the natural gravitational pulls in music.
    I think it will happen in the cook cook book but the other songwriter courses over looked this.

    Good to see we have a good group thanks for the reply.
    I posted these natural way the music flows for a few years in other forum.s and someone made a chart maybe I can post the chart here.
    Life. Laugh and Play.

    https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/_e...20Sequence.jpg

  11. #11
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    Default

    Stevo,
    There is a great website that talks about the "natural" progressions of chords http://mugglinw.ipower.com/chordmaps/index.htm

    Here is the map that the author, Steve Mugglin, created.

    Honey, I'm spending money on guitars or women, ... your choice.

    If you take Satan for a ride, pretty soon he'll want to drive.


    Favorite Course - Blues Alchemy
    Working On - Fretboard Epiphanies & Jump Blues

  12. #12

    Default

    am I late ? I will check this out tonight.
    all the best

  13. #13

    Default Steve Mugglin

    Thanks
    I had seen Steve's chart, someone posted it in a thread about the circle of fifths.
    I was amazed as O use the Circle like a map .
    I did not see the theory as too why all these work at his site , could be there I had trouble navigating the site.
    This course seem like it would explain it so I have to get busy.
    The chart is good well worth printing and playing with.
    Me I play mostly blues and popular music,
    Great link, I was surprise my link worked it is basic, no substitutions just the major scale.
    Peace

  14. #14

    Default

    OK this thread has turned into an interesting topic folks.
    So in the major scale we have these chords I ii iii IV V vi and vii(dim).
    I, IV and V are major, ii, iii and vi are minor and vii is diminished (and the latest is not used that much in songwriting and popular music).
    When you play I at the start of a song you stablish a tonality, a frame, a 'home', then you start to abandon home using other chords, now which chords?
    harmony theory distinguishes tonic chords, sub dominant chords and dominant chords : these are functions of the chords in the harmony.
    tonic chords: i, iii and vi.
    sub dominant : ii and IV
    and dominant : V, vii (and sometime iii).

    Tonic chords are home....it's where we find peace ,it's the resolution. Before the resolution we need tension: dominant brings the highest tension in order to get home. But before we go to the dominant we need the subdominant.

    So harmony mostly is a combination of tonic > subdominant > dominant > tonic chords. that's why they are recognizable to the ear of the listeners.

    Ex: C, F, G, C. (it's a song based on the tonic (C) which goes to subdominant (F) , which goes to the dominant (G) which goes back to the tonic (home) C.

    the beauty of these functions is that we can start substituting them:
    I can be replaced by vi ( C can be replaced by Am), and so on.

    and yes,tertiary harmony is the measure of the notes in a chord (minor or major thirds which are the intervals between the notes).
    Last edited by Rgalvez; 01-25-2012 at 09:40 PM.

  15. #15

    Default

    Thanks
    Rgalvez.

  16. #16

    Default

    Steveo..is it ok? If you have any questions, doubts, just share them with us man

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