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  1. #1

    Default Learning and seeing intervals on the fretboard

    What would be a good system for learning
    intervals on the guitar?



    Angelo

  2. #2
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    Without thinking too much about this, I remember there is a course Interval Insights Which may be a good place to start.

    I guess the follow up is what about intervals do you want to learn?
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  3. #3

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    Interval Insights is a good start, but if you search for a system to help you see the information on the fretboard, I'd recomment either

    The Efficient Guitarist

    or

    Caged Cracked

    Mopper
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  4. #4

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    Thanks guys I'll check those courses out!!


    Angelo

  5. #5

    Wink One more thing

    I think Fretboard Breakthroughs by Howard Morgen is an excellent tool for this as well. He starts out by discussing the tuning of the guitar and how it is unique and for a reason. He goes on to discuss octaves and then to show a neat way to find any octave note on the guitar with a little pattern he gives. I would try learning the interval patterns in relationship to the root note using Morgen's method. It's just another tool in the shed, but I am such a poor craftsman that I really need them all.
    Last edited by wvgman; 10-04-2010 at 08:13 PM.
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  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by wvgman View Post
    I think Fretboard Breakthroughs by Howard Morgen is an excellent tool for this as well. He starts out by discussing the tuning of the guitar and how it is unique and for a reason. He goes on to discuss octaves and then to show a neat way to find any octave note on the guitar with a little pattern he gives. I would try learning the interval patterns in relationship to the root note using Morgen's method. It's just another tool in the shed, but I am such a poor craftsman that I really need them all.
    DITTO !!! This course is unique!!

  7. #7

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    Fretboard Breakthrough is a course i will get into
    in a few weeks when I set aside some time. I've
    heard a lot of great things from this course......looking forward to it




    Angelo

  8. #8

    Wink

    Yep, the boys got you covered Angelo, those 4 courses pretty much take care of intervals!

    Let us know how it goes!
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  9. #9

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    This might be more basic than you are looking for but here is something that helps me.

    There are 7 tones (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7).

    First learn to find octaves (the first two tones in the TAB below.)

    Then learn the shape that 1, 4 & 5 form (the last three tones in the TAB below).


    Then learn the 3, which is just one fret below the 4.
    And learn the 7, which is one fret below the octave.
    (the TAB shows the 1, 3 and 7 in that order)


    Then all that is left is the 6, which is on the same fret as 3 but one string higher.
    (TAB shows 1 and 6)


    Over time, you will recognize these little shapes in chords that you play.
    This is only one of several fingerings that these intervals can form. for instance, 1, 4, and 5 can also be played like this:
    Last edited by rjbasque; 06-23-2013 at 08:58 AM. Reason: Remove tinylick link

  10. #10

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    WOW.....very cool system you have there.

    That will definitely help


    Thanks a bunch



    Angelo

  11. #11

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    Arjr,

    In addition to the most excellent info already presented here I would add one thing to your study of intervals. Learn to harmonize the major and minor scales in Octaves, thirds and sixths. These are probably the most "popular" intervals in popular music and are quite cool to incorporate into both lead and rhythm playing. Octaves get you into that Wes Montgomery feel (and everyone who followed him), thirds are cool for harmonized leads a la the Allmans or Thin Lizzy, Chuck Berry also used them a lot, and finally sixths are everywhere in country, blues and R & B tunes (think Steve Cropper and Soulman).

  12. #12

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    I think in addition to the courses and info mentioned, ear training will help. I think "feeling" the intervals is possibly more important than "Knowing" them. Singing harmony and learning to target each scale tone is a great way to train your ear to work with intervals!!

    I think this vid proves my point
    Last edited by slasner; 10-06-2010 at 02:50 PM.

  13. #13

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    There's a lot information and I greatly appreciate it

    I'm just starting off on memorizing interval names and such.
    For ex. what is a maj 2nd, Perfect 4th.....etc.

    Then I'll start applying that to the fretboard. I
    really like Beboys approach.

    Afterwards I'll settle in on Fretboard Breakthrough.

    I think that will keep me busy for the next few month

    Angelo

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by arjr77 View Post
    There's a lot information and I greatly appreciate it

    I'm just starting off on memorizing interval names and such.
    For ex. what is a maj 2nd, Perfect 4th.....etc.

    Then I'll start applying that to the fretboard. I
    really like Beboys approach.

    Afterwards I'll settle in on Fretboard Breakthrough.

    I think that will keep me busy for the next few month

    Angelo
    the term major means that it's a natural note in the scale, so the term major doesn't need to be used, in other words a major 3rd is the same as a 3rd! A minor 3rd would mean it's a flatted 3rd or a half step flat of the 3rd. So if we are in the key of G, G is 1, B is the 3rd, Bb would be the flatted 3rd.

    I know this can be confusing but if you just relax, think about it and study the major scale you will gain an understanding. I'd suggest learning the major scale inside and out!! Play it on the guitar in every key, write it on paper in every key, make a chart that has each note of the scale as well as it's intervalic relationship, here's an example, I'll use the key of C because there are no sharps or flats in that key.

    C=1
    D=2
    E=3
    F=4
    G-5
    A=6
    B=7

    Also understand C=1 but it also =8
    D=2 but it also =9
    E=3 but it also =10

    Are we seeing a pattern?

    I would also recommend Improvisational Tool Kit from TrueFire, it gives charts showing all the scale formulas as well as chord formulas and a great explanation of modes!!

    Good luck, keep asking questions, the guys here are awesome and will help you learn!!!

  15. #15

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    "the term major means that it's a natural note in the scale, so the term major doesn't need to be used, in other words a major 3rd is the same as a 3rd! A minor 3rd would mean it's a flatted 3rd or a half step flat of the 3rd. So if we are in the key of G, G is 1, B is the 3rd, Bb would be the flatted 3rd.

    I know this can be confusing but if you just relax, think about it and study the major scale you will gain an understanding. I'd suggest learning the major scale inside and out!! Play it on the guitar in every key, write it on paper in every key, make a chart that has each note of the scale as well as it's intervalic relationship, here's an example, I'll use the key of C because there are no sharps or flats in that key.

    C=1
    D=2
    E=3
    F=4
    G-5
    A=6
    B=7

    Also understand C=1 but it also =8
    D=2 but it also =9
    E=3 but it also =10

    Are we seeing a pattern?

    I would also recommend Improvisational Tool Kit from TrueFire, it gives charts showing all the scale formulas as well as chord formulas and a great explanation of modes!!

    Good luck, keep asking questions, the guys here are awesome and will help you learn!!!
    "



    Thank you slasner.....ugh there's so much work to be done.

    Time to hit the shed!!!!!


    Angelo
    Last edited by arjr77; 10-08-2010 at 12:29 AM.

  16. #16

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    Here's a quick lesson on Major, minor, Perfect and diminished intervals.

    1, 4, 5 are Perfect intervals.

    That's because the 4 and 5 don't clash with the root.

    The other intervals 2, 3, 6, 7 are called Major intervals.

    If you flat (b) a Major interval it becomes a minor interval.
    b2, b3, b6, b7 are minor intervals.

    If you flat a Perfect interval (5 becomes b5) or flat a minor interval (b7 becomes bb7) they will become a diminished interval.

    Recap:
    1, 4, 5 Perfect intervals
    2, 3, 6, 7 Major intervals
    b2, b3, b6, b7 minor intervals
    b5, bb7 diminished intervals

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