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  1. #1

    Talking No more amazing guitar players?

    Here's a quote from a recent Jeff Beck interview
    (The full article can be read at his website)

    "You don’t ever hear stories about amazing guitar players any more, because most records don’t have them. Coldplay, they were doing three-note, catchy hooks – fantastic, but it’s not Cream number two or Jimi Hendrix number two. I think we probably have to say goodbye to that."

    Is he right? Do you know of any counterexamples?

    From the top of my head only the guy from the White Stripes, Jack White, comes to mind. But more because of his participation in the movie "it might get loud" than his music.
    And then there is the other guy which seems to be a persona non grata around here (see the thread about guitarist you don't dig) http://truefire.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5658)

    There must be more?!

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by mopper511 View Post
    Here's a quote from a recent Jeff Beck interview
    (The full article can be read at his website)



    And then there is the other guy which seems to be a persona non grata around here (see the thread about guitarist you don't dig) http://truefire.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5658)

    There must be more?!
    Could it be...http://www.youtube.com/user/mayermusic

  3. #3

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    I have been saying this for some time now. We still have some of the great guitarists from the past with us...Clapton, EVH, Beck, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Arlen Roth...but where is the next generation? Mayer? Is that the future of guitar? Spare me if that's the case...

    But I don't really blame the younger generation...it used to be that the guitar greats of the past would take someone under their wing and nurture them and introduce them to the public...

    In 20 years I really wonder what will be out there to listen too?
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  4. #4

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    My personal opinion is that the golden era of rock and blues has passed. Of course there are excellent players and some cool music out there, but there are not 'big' contributions to the genre. Now with all the computers applications in music I think the interest in developing sounds are going in other directions...The same goes to jazz...you can see that there are cool players, but they still improvise over the same Gershwin, Ellington and Porter standards.

  5. #5
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    I got the new Jeff Beck album. The 2nd song on it is a throwback to the Wired days on a song dedicated to Jan Hammer. Pretty good. Beck, even at his advanced age is pretty impressive though. He is extremely melodic, in a sci-fi way. I still don't understand how anyone learned to play like that. His signature sound, and it has been this way even since the days when RodStewart was an unknown singer on Jeff Beck's album, is "acid rock". Yet he throws in this melodic sensibility.

    The guy is a living legend, and will probably not be totally appreciated until his death.
    now trying to break 1900.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by mopper511 View Post
    "You donít ever hear stories about amazing guitar players any more, because most records donít have them. Coldplay, they were doing three-note, catchy hooks Ė fantastic, but itís not Cream number two or Jimi Hendrix number two. I think we probably have to say goodbye to that."
    I think this says more about Jeff Beck's tastes than any else. There are plenty of amazing guitar players out there. The key phrase here is that "You don't ever hear stories about amazing guitar players..." This probably says more about the media and record producers then it does about players.

    Jeff Beck, with all due respect (and you're due a lot), do a little more research. There's this great new thing called the internet...

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rgalvez View Post
    ...The same goes to jazz...you can see that there are cool players, but they still improvise over the same Gershwin, Ellington and Porter standards.
    This may be true but thank God there are players doing Gershwin, etc., just like there are players still playing Beethoven, etc.

    This is timeless music and the more we learn about the history of it the better we are as guitar players.

  8. #8
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    All the past guitar greats did something different. either with technique, flair, sound, whatever. In the rock/blues area I don't see that. Where I do see it is in the acoustic area. Michael Hedges, Kaki King, Rodrigo y Gabriela, Vicky Genfan.

    But I also see that in popular music (for the masses) there is very little emphasis on the band, or whomever is generating the music. The focus is on the performer, and notice I didn't say singer. Because I see many popular artists where the singing is marginal, but the 'package' of look, energy, presence, dance, etc.. is more the draw than the actual vocal. And NO I WILL NOT get into any specifics.

    This also relates to the old discussion of where do you get to see live music. Almost all the clubs are dance clubs, playing loud, thumping nondescript beats for the crowd to jump around to. (and of course get thirsty and purchase beverages)

    Sorry [/RANT]
    Honey, I'm spending money on guitars or women, ... your choice.

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  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by herby View Post
    This may be true but thank God there are players doing Gershwin, etc., just like there are players still playing Beethoven, etc.

    This is timeless music and the more we learn about the history of it the better we are as guitar players.
    I agree with you: I was not complaining about the classic standards..what I meant is that there are no 'new' standards, no new composers that would be considered classics. that's why I think the genre doesn't grow.

  10. #10

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    There are more great guitarists today than there was in the sixties. And that is perhaps the reason that "You don't ever hear stories about amazing guitar players...". It's simply much harder to stand out.

    The stories belongs to an era where the guitar players created something never heard before.
    The music, the sound, the stage-show; everything changed more drastically in the sixties than ever before and ever after.
    Musically, new land was discovered every day, and people didn't walkout if you played a 20 minute guitar solo.

    Times are changing.
    Johnny

    Less is more

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by herby View Post
    Jeff Beck, with all due respect (and you're due a lot), do a little more research. There's this great new thing called the internet...
    I hate to admit to this, but I was coding web pages in HTML before there was a Frontpage and browsers were a brand new thing. I was a computer engineer for 15 years before becoming half engineer/half accountant. If I had a dime for every night I spent in the lobby/bar at a hotel in Silicon Valley and route 128, I'd, I'd, I'd, have a bunch of dimes.....

    But back to the topic, I must say, most of the world agrees with you. I am interested in musicality, not shredding, not a 5 year old chinese boy who can play Freebird with chopsticks, etc. I listen to a lot of guitar players, mostly jazz, mostly Bossa, not all guitar albums either. "great new thing called the internet".

    Oh, I should mention that I play mostly jazz standards. Right now I am working on RAY'S IDEA. "YOU NEVER HEARD RAYS IDEA? WELL YOUR GOING TO HEAR IT NOW....."

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=abs6AyHZvXA
    Last edited by richb2; 04-22-2010 at 03:51 PM.
    now trying to break 1900.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny View Post
    There are more great guitarists today than there was in the sixties. And that is perhaps the reason that "You don't ever hear stories about amazing guitar players...". It's simply much harder to stand out.

    The stories belongs to an era where the guitar players created something never heard before.
    The music, the sound, the stage-show; everything changed more drastically in the sixties than ever before and ever after.
    Musically, new land was discovered every day, and people didn't walkout if you played a 20 minute guitar solo.

    Times are changing.
    Name one NEW guitar great that is anywhere near the same level as those from the 60's, 70's AND 80's...And just because one of the greats from the past is still alive today doesn't mean he counts as a great from TODAY's age. I am sorry but I have to completely disagree with you on this Johnny. I agree that times are changing...it is definitely more challenging to make an impact musically in this day and age. The stories from the 60's & 70's are amazing....but stories have been around since the beginning of time. They shouldn't end in this age...with the advent of the internet there should be MORE stories...

    The only guitarist that i can see coming close is Rodrigo y Gabriela who created their own style and it is starting to take off in popularity...

    ***Definition of a guitar great*** just so we are clear (and you may add to this definition) a guitar great is not only a guitarist with chops, rhythm, and a musical genius...but also is changing music as we know it. EVH, Hendrix, Clapton, Beck, B.B. King, Page Lennon & Harrison, Scotty Moore, Chuck Berry...ALL changed music history as it pertains to the guitar...
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by mikespe View Post
    Name one NEW guitar great that is anywhere near the same level as those from the 60's, 70's AND 80's...
    If you try to define a great guitarist by the standards from the 60's, 70's and 80's its not gonna work. This is 2010, society has changed a lot since then and music has changed a lot too.

    Quote Originally Posted by mikespe View Post
    ***Definition of a guitar great*** just so we are clear (and you may add to this definition) a guitar great is not only a guitarist with chops, rhythm, and a musical genius...but also is changing music as we know it. EVH, Hendrix, Clapton, Beck, B.B. King, Page Lennon & Harrison, Scotty Moore, Chuck Berry...ALL changed music history as it pertains to the guitar...
    There are a lot of people who are expanding music on the guitar as we know it and doing things that have never been done before. But since the place of the guitar in modern music has changed these guys don't get seen as greats as such. The guys you've listed above were great guitarists (although no more than some of the guys coming out today). The difference is that they were playing their stuff at the right time in history when music on the whole was undergoing massive change.
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  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by tev77 View Post
    The guys you've listed above were great guitarists (although no more than some of the guys coming out today). The difference is that they were playing their stuff at the right time in history when music on the whole was undergoing massive change.
    There is no such thing as the "right time". You MAKE your time. IF the music was good enough the fans will react. Music is in a constant state of evolution. It's liquid...flows like water. A musician directs that flow. Respectfully I'll stand by my original post...Where are the great guitarists of today?
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  15. #15
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    "There are more great guitarists today than there was in the sixties. And that is perhaps the reason that "You don't ever hear stories about amazing guitar players...". It's simply much harder to stand out.

    The stories belongs to an era where the guitar players created something never heard before.
    The music, the sound, the stage-show; everything changed more drastically in the sixties than ever before and ever after.
    Musically, new land was discovered every day, and people didn't walkout if you played a 20 minute guitar solo.

    Times are changing."

    Well Mike I kind of agree with Johnny on this one. I think the following have added greatly to all that is guitar:

    Brad Paisley http://bradpaisley.musiccitynetworks.com/index.htm

    Craig Chaquico http://www.craigchaquico.com/

    John Petrucci http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Petrucci

    The guys from California Guitar Trio http://www.cgtrio.com/

    Paul Gilbert http://www.paulgilbert.com/new_index.html

    Andy Aledort here at Truefire (truly this cat is a legend)

    The Gypsy Kings http://www.gipsykings.com/

    Al Dimeola http://www.aldimeola.com/new-site/index.php

    Robert Randolph and The Family Band http://www.robertrandolph.net/

    Maybe my categories don't fit with everyone else but all of these folks are great players and have had a significant impact in music. Plus there are many more.

    Over saturation is part of the problem the other is I just don't know who's out there nor do I listen to much new music. On the way home we passed one of the biggest concert venues in town and kids were already lined up way around the block for some band called "Angels and Airwaves?" I know nothing about guitarists in 98% of the new bands. Who knows, there could very well be some guitar godz out there but they are just not in my window of the world.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

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  16. #16

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    A requirement that something new and earth-shattering be produced to earn sainthood seems a bit over the top...

    ok, so is my intro...

    but there many talented, highly musical and inspirational guitarists today..I don't care if they never get into the 'Who's the best guitarist?' category...

    I vote for Brad Carlton & Frank Vignola...with no disrespect for the many others here at TF and elsewhere...


    ---------------------------------------
    I'm a bit confused by the Jon Faddis video's poster (Mr Saxomen?)...one of the musicians listed is Michael Brecker...who had passed away nearly 2-1/2 years prior to the date listed for the concert

    Wow, I guess people are allowed to older and larger...but I didn't recognize any of those guys...because I hadn't seen pics of them in 10...15..maybe 20 years?

    Murray
    Last edited by murrayatuptown; 04-22-2010 at 10:50 PM.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by murrayatuptown View Post
    A requirement that something new and earth-shattering be produced to earn sainthood seems a bit over the top...

    ok, so is my intro...

    but there many talented, highly musical and inspirational guitarists today..I don't care if they never get into the 'Who's the best guitarist?' category...
    I agree but the title of this thread is "No more AMAZING guitar players?" I am just staying within the context of the thread. Of course there are good guitarists alive today...some quite impressive. But where are the AMAZING guitar greats that our instrument is known for. Sure we can twist the context of this thread to include other guitarists...

    I agree with Wolfboy I left out Brad Paisley who is changing country music with his playing. The others he mentioned are excellent players...I could only DREAM to be half as good as them. But again, just don't fit in the context of this thread. IMHO
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  18. #18

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    I think Jeff Beck didn't mean that there are no more great guitarists out there, but they most often don't have an impact on the "masses" anymore. Most young guitarists will stay in a niche, e.g. in the Blues or Jazz Genre.

    Where is a new band in which the guitarist is a defining element for the sound and style of the band (like Bono, Page, Knopfler, May have been....the list is endless)?
    And Wolfboy, by new I mean a few years at most. Your examples are all great guitarists but most of them are more than 10, 20 or 40 years in the business.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mopper511 View Post
    And Wolfboy, by new I mean a few years at most. Your examples are all great guitarists but most of them are more than 10, 20 or 40 years in the business.
    I was thinking about who are the new guys, and I only came up w/3

    1) Joe Bonamassa - I think he might be more than 10 yrs
    2) Derek Trucks - He was born playing on stage w/ The Allmans, wasn't he?
    3) Johhny Hiland - Various reasons he hasn't set the world on fire.

    I ought to talk to my son about this, but I can't remember hearing about anyone since Johhny.

    Sort of related. There's a show on VH1 Classic, "That Metal Show". They were discussing a while back about "Ozzfest", and what current bands could headline a similar type festival. And the conclusion was that there really weren't any. And this is from a syndicated hard-rock media guy that has virtually unlimited access to bands/material. Heck he had Ace Frehley at his wedding.
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  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by tev77 View Post
    But since the place of the guitar in modern music has changed these guys don't get seen as greats as such.
    I think you hit the nail on the head there tev77
    Johnny

    Less is more

  21. #21
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    Yeah I guess a few might be a bit old...

    I stick by Brad Paisley
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

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  22. #22
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    The question is one of preference. To say "no your wrong" is moronic. It is a stupid question. It is a post that is akin to "what is your favorite color?". IMO.
    now trying to break 1900.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjbasque View Post
    I was thinking about who are the new guys, and I only came up w/3

    1) Joe Bonamassa - I think he might be more than 10 yrs
    2) Derek Trucks - He was born playing on stage w/ The Allmans, wasn't he?
    3) Johhny Hiland - Various reasons he hasn't set the world on fire.
    Funny, these were exactly the three which I have thought of too. Joe Bonamassa is about 20 years in the business but he is still young! From his bio:
    Last year also coincided with Bonamassaís twentieth year as a professional musician, an extraordinary timeline for a young artist just into his í30s.
    Derek Trucks: I love his "Already free" album!

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by richb2 View Post
    The question is one of preference. To say "no your wrong" is moronic. It is a stupid question. It is a post that is akin to "what is your favorite color?". IMO.
    No one is saying anyone is "wrong" and calling someone "moronic" is wrong. The question itself is not stupid and it comes up on just about all the guitar message boards. It does cause a heated debate because people do have their favorites. Problem is that the question is not about "favorite" ...it is about where are the great guitarists of today...it is a very good question...one that I hope encourages young guitarists to work hard enough to fill the void.
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  25. #25
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    You are probably right. This is the type of "debate" that appears on most guitar sites.
    Last edited by richb2; 04-24-2010 at 02:58 PM.
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