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  1. #51
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    Hi Charles, thanks for stopping in
    I got distracted for a bit but wanted to finish off this section tonight.

    The hardest part about these solos is playing it up to speed. Joe uses 200bpm....pretty fast!

    Solo 2
    slide
    full bend
    sustain
    full bend
    sustain
    "infinite" slide

    Pretty straight forward little riff. Sounds a bit different at full speed, really fits nice.

    Solo 3
    Starts off with a couple of rakes, almost like sweep picking
    Some nice little things to add to your technique repertoire. As Charles says, these are great building blocks and you can hear how they fit in.

    Now Joe throws in comments about b3rd or minor 3rd. Remember were in the key of G so the third is B and b3rd is Bb.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  2. #52

    Default Damp and/or Stop

    Hey Charles,

    Whenever the terms "Damp" and/or "Stop" come up in BRRT, they're meant to refer to one of two techniques to stop guitar notes from sustaining. That is, Fret Hand or Pick Hand Damping.

    Fret Hand Damping refers to quickly lifting the fretting finger(s) "up, but not off" of the currently fretted string(s). Whereas, Pick Hand Damping refers to using the pick hand palm and/or index fingertip(s) and/or sides to quickly touch and/or "stop" the current note(s) from sustaining.

    Hope that helps,

    Joe

  3. #53

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    That certainly does help, thank you Joe!

  4. #54
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    Time to move on to a man who is so legendary he has a rhythm named after him....

    Bo Diddley and the Bo Diddley beat


    The blues is a form of music that can be vocal, instrumental (blues guitar) or both. It uses the ‘blue’ notes which are based on a ‘minor pentatonic’ scale most of the time, otherwise known as the blues scale.

    Blues music was derived from the African-American communities in the U.S. out of work songs, spiritual songs, field hollers, chants, shouts and simple ballads that rhymed. A lot of aspects of the blues are indicative of African influence.

    The call-and-response aspect of the music came directly from African roots and there were a lot of lines that would get repeated twice or more. This later evolved into a line repeating twice and then on the third time around there would be an ‘answer line’. You can still find these characteristics of early blues in modern day music, especially hip-hop.

    The term ‘The Blues’ refers to the ‘blue devils’ which means down spirits or sadness.

    The blues guitar plays a heavy role in blues music as well as modern music. It has influenced Jazz, Rhythm and Blues, Bluegrass and even Rock N’ Roll tremendously.

    The original blues of the early 1900’s, otherwise known as “poor man’s blues” was normally associated with hard times, oppression from white folk, cruelty of the police, gambling, economic depression, floods, magic, farming and dry periods. This music was fueled by a lot of heartache and depression. Usually a lost loved one or an overall harsh environment inspired the lyrics and the tone of the blues guitar.

    The blues guitar style emerged from the American South’s instruments of the time which were the banjo and the Diddley Bow. This was a home made one stringed instrument that was popular in the early 20th century. Figures such as Robert Johnson, Charley Patton, Son House and Blind Willie McTell were a part of the delta blues style.
    http://www.detourblues.com/complete-...r-its-origins/

    So what is a diddey bow?

    Antique diddley bow


    an electric diddley bow:




    I love this one, the usual one string but using a pocket knife for a slide:


    I noticed that beer bottles are often used as either a bridge or a slide as in this photo:




    This is a great video touching on the history. It has some African musicians playing a beautiful song (notice using the dip can as a slide), followed by Buffey Saint Marie playing a "mouth bow" which is the oldest form of what we call a diddley bow. It is basically a hunter's bow used as an instrument. At the end you actually see the great blues player Lonnie Pitchford build and play a didlley bow with 2 nails, some broom wire (the wire used to hold all the straw together on an old style broom) and a slat shaker for the bridge. Really it's an interesting clip.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynatMK2sYJI

    Here's another classic example:
    Bill Abel playing the diddley bow
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4MsY0...eature=related
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 03-13-2010 at 11:57 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  5. #55
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    Now what is the history on the clave' rhythn?

    Clave (rhythm)

    Clave is a rhythmic pattern which originates in West African music and was standardized in Cuba. The clave serves as a time-keeper and essentially all Afro-Cuban music, as well as salsa, is based around the clave rhythm. The name comes from the claves percussion instrument, two small wooden sticks that are hit together to produce a high-pitched sound. There are four main clave groups.

    The most common type of clave is called "'son clave'", named by the Cuban musical style:

    The above is the 3-2 clave, the 2-3 clave is the same but with the measures reversed.

    Another type is rumba clave. It also can be in the 3-2 direction, as may be shown below, and in the 2-3 direction.

    The third Cuban clave, the "6/8 clave" is an adaptation of the 6/8 cowbell pattern and is played mainly in the "rumba columbia", a rumba played in 6/8.

    The fourth one is the Brazilian "bossa clave", adapted by Brazilian musicians in the 1950's.

    The origins of the rhythms are in polyrhythms of African music, which give more examples of clave rhythm.

    Although this term is mostly used in the context of Afro-Cuban music, in fact it permeates the whole Rock and Roll music as the Bo Diddly beat or Bo Diddley beat, which was the signature rhythm of Bo Diddley and is rooted in African rhythms. This rhythm used to be memorized by the catch phrase "Shave and a haircut, two dimes" (inflation turned it into "Shave and a haircut, two bits"), pronounced with this rhythm.
    http://www.fact-archive.com/encyclopedia/Clave_(rhythm)



    'Claves' is the name for an instrument used in Caribbean music, composed of two short but thick sticks, usually of as hard a wood as possible, often rosewood. They have great cutting power despite their small size, and play a very important role in certain types of music, especially Latin music.

    The Term 'clave' also refers to the rhythms played on these instruments, and to the concept which is embodied in these rhythms. The clave acts as a sort of backbone, a guide, if you will, to which the other instruments and the dancers synchronize themselves..If the other rhythms line up properly with the clave rhythm, the music is said to be "in clave". Traditionally the clave rhythm was always heard on the claves, but nowadays, a timbalero or other percussionist may be playing the clave rhythm on a wood or plastic block, along with other parts.
    http://www.rhythmweb.com/clave/index.html
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:29 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  6. #56

    Arrow

    This was one of those that I let go by ..Wish I had jumped on it way back when..
    It’s the first lesson from CB’s Rhythm Swat Camp…(Check it out)
    Wolfboy you posted some good info there too..(As usual)
    http://truefire.com/forum/showthread.php?t=4365&page=5
    I still struggle with this bad boy...

    I just saw an episode of “ House” and in the opening House was playing an Acoustic Guitar and playing a song with this beat.
    Anybody know what song it was..?
    (if ya’d happen to seen it) would like to learn it

    Here is a Backing track for “not fade away”
    http://www.guitarbt.com/index.php?pa...t=Bo%20Diddely


    Best Ever !


    Praise Be The Lord, My Rock, Who Trains My Hands For War, and My Fingers For Battle;


    My name is Michael Westen. I used to be a spy.
    Check out the "Triads & Hendrixian Double Stops" Study Group" Put in your 2 Cents

    http://truefire.com/forum/showthread...ot-Study-Group


  7. #57
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    Now on to the man himself
    Bo Didley:






    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 05-03-2010 at 11:45 AM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  8. #58
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    Born Otha Ellas Bates (later known as Ellas McDaniel), 28 December 1928, McComb, Mississippi, USA. After beginning his career as a boxer, where he received the sobriquet "Bo Diddley", the singer worked the blues clubs of Chicago with a repertoire influenced by Louis Jordan, John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters. In late 1954, he teamed up with Billy Boy Arnold and recorded demos of "I'm A Man" and "Bo Diddley". Re-recorded at Chess Studios with a backing ensemble comprising Otis Spann (piano), Lester Davenport (harmonica), Frank Kirkland (drums) and Jerome Green (maracas), the a-side, "Bo Diddley", became an R&B hit in 1955. Before long, Diddley's distorted, amplified, custom-made guitar, with its rectangular shape and pumping rhythm style became a familiar, much-imitated trademark, as did his self-referential songs with such titles as "Bo Diddley's A Gunslinger", "Diddley Daddy" and "Bo's A Lumberjack". His jive-talking routine with "Say Man" (a US Top 20 hit in 1959) continued on "Pretty Thing" and "Hey Good Lookin'", which reached the lower regions of the UK charts in 1963. By then, Diddley was regarded as something of an R&B legend and found a new lease of life courtesy of the UK beat boom. The Pretty Things named themselves after one of his songs, while his work was covered by such artists as the Rolling Stones, the Animals, Manfred Mann, the Kinks, the Yardbirds, Downliners Sect and the Zephyrs. Diddley subsequently jammed on albums by Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters and appeared infrequently at rock festivals. His classic version of "Who Do You Love" became a staple cover for a new generation of US acts ranging from Quicksilver Messenger Service to the Doors, Tom Rush and Bob Seger, while the UK's Juicy Lucy took the song into the UK Top 20.
    http://www.bo-diddley.com/

    Bo Diddley in "Trading places"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MF6AtI2dpA
    " In Philidelphia it's worth...$50 bucks!"

    "Bo, you don't know diddley"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GPxkpjCvWI

    Blues Brothers 2000 where Bo appeared alongside legendary guitarists B.B. King, Eric Clapton and Jeff "Skunk" Baxter as members of the Louisiana Gator Boys
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FyARF3CSII0


    The Bo Diddley beat and guitar


    Bo Diddley was well known for the "Bo Diddley beat," a rumba-like beat similar to "hambone", a style used by street performers who play out the beat by slapping and patting their arms, legs, chest, and cheeks while chanting rhymes.[40] Somewhat resembling "shave and a haircut, two bits" beat, Diddley came across it while trying to play Gene Autry's "(I've Got Spurs That) Jingle, Jangle, Jingle".[41] Three years before Bo's "Bo Diddley", a song that closely resembles it, "Hambone", was cut by Red Saunders' Orchestra with The Hambone Kids.

    In its simplest form, the Bo Diddley beat can be counted out as a two-bar phrase:

    "One and two and three and four and one and two and three and four and..."

    The bolded counts are the clave rhythm. "Shave and a haircut, two bits", another clave derivative, also fits, as does the non-musician's count of "one-two-three one-two".

    His songs (for example, "Hey Bo Diddley" and "Who Do You Love?") often have no chord changes; that is, the musicians play the same chord throughout the piece, so that the rhythms create the excitement, rather than having the excitement generated by harmonic tension and release. In his other recordings, Bo Diddley used a variety of rhythms, from straight back beat to pop ballad style to doo-wop, frequently with maracas by Jerome Green.

    Also an influential guitar player, he developed many special effects and other innovations in tone and attack. Bo Diddley's trademark instrument was the rectangular-bodied Gretsch nicknamed "The Twang Machine" (referred to as "cigar-box shaped" by music promoter Dick Clark). Although he had other odd-shaped guitars custom-made for him by other manufacturers throughout the years, most notably the "Cadillac" design made by Tom Holmes (who also made guitars for ZZ Top's Billy Gibbons, among others), Diddley fashioned the square guitar himself around 1958 and wielded it in thousands of concerts over the years. In a 2005 interview on JJJ radio in Australia, Bo implied that the design sprang from an embarrassing moment. During an early gig, while jumping around on stage with a Gibson L5 guitar, he landed awkwardly hurting his groin.[42] [43] He then went about designing a smaller, less restrictive guitar that allowed him to keep jumping around on stage while still playing his guitar. He also played the violin, which is featured on his mournful instrumental "The Clock Strikes Twelve", a 12-bar blues.[44]

    He often created lyrics as witty and humorous adaptations of folk music themes. The song "Bo Diddley" was based on the lullaby "Hush Little Baby." Likewise, "Hey Bo Diddley" is based on the song "Old MacDonald". The rap-style boasting of "Who Do You Love", a wordplay on hoodoo, used many striking lyrics from the African-American tradition of toasts and boasts. His "Say Man" and "Say Man, Back Again," both of which were later cited as progenerators of hip-hop music, share a strong connection to the insult game known as "the dozens". For example: "You got the nerve to call somebody ugly, why you so ugly the stork that brought you into the world ought to be arrested."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bo_Didd...eat_and_guitar

    The Bo Diddley beat has been used in compositions by many other artists, including:

    * Buddy Holly "Not Fade Away"
    * The Rolling Stones "Please Go Home"
    * The Who "Magic Bus"
    * Elvis Presley "His Latest Flame"
    * Bruce Springsteen "She's the One"
    * U2 "Desire"
    * The Jesus and Mary Chain "Bo Diddley Is Jesus"
    * Stevie Ray Vaughan "Willie the Wimp"
    * Shirley & Company "Shame, Shame, Shame"
    * The Smiths "How Soon Is Now?"
    * Roxette "Harleys and Indians (Riders in the Sky)"
    * Aerosmith "Sweet Emotion"
    * Billy Joel "Don't Ask Me Why"
    * Dee Clark, a former member of the Hambone Kids (see above) "Hey Little Girl"
    * Johnny Otis "Willie and the Hand Jive"
    * George Michael "Faith"
    * Normaal "Kearl van Stoahl"
    * Elton John "Billy Bones and the White Bird"
    * The Strangeloves "I Want Candy"
    * Ace Frehley "New York Groove"
    * KT Tunstall "Black Horse and the Cherry Tree"
    * Primal Scream "Movin' on Up"
    * Tom Petty "A Mind with a Heart of Its Own
    * David Bowie "Panic in Detroit"
    * Robert Wyatt "Heaps Of Sheeps"
    * Joan Jett and the Blackhearts "Be Straight"
    * The Pretenders "Cuban Slide", "Break Up the Concrete"
    * The Police "Deathwish"
    * The Guess Who "Follow Your Daughter Home"
    * Wayne Fontana & The Mindbenders "Game of Love"
    * The Supremes "When the Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes"
    * Jefferson Airplane "She Has Funny Cars"
    * The White Stripes "Screwdriver"
    * The Byrds "Don't Doubt Yourself, Babe"
    * Medicine Show "Lucy, Go Lightly"
    * The Stooges "1969"
    * Husker Du "Hare Krishna"
    * Hamilton Bohannon "Disco Hop"
    * "Weird Al" Yankovic "Party at the Leper Colony"
    * Guns N' Roses "Mr Brownstone"
    * Green Day "Castaway"
    * Pat Benatar "Love Is a Battlefield"
    * Sha Na Na "Born to Hand Jive" (from the soundtrack of the musical Grease)
    * Allman Brothers Band "No One to Run With"
    * The Miracles "Mickey's Monkey"
    * Nick Lowe "I Love the Sound of Breaking Glass"
    * The Saints "Swing for the Crime"
    * The Electric Prunes "Get me to the World on Time"
    * Mickey Jupp "Joggin'" "The Ballad of Billy Bonney"
    * The Clash "Rudie Can't Fail"
    * Tenpole Tudor "There Are Boys"
    * Eels "My Beloved Monstrosity"
    * The Beat Farmers "Big Big Man"
    * The Fall "Bo Demmick", "Diceman"
    * Diane Renay "Watch Out, Sally"
    * The Mars Volta"Day of the Baphomets"
    * Black Eyed Peas "Electric City"
    * Toto "Rosanna"
    * Los Bravos "Bring a Little Lovin'"
    * The Trashmen "Bird Diddley Beat"
    * Amr Diab "Nour El Ain"
    * The La's "Feelin"
    * Sublime "Caress Me Down"
    * Love and Rockets "Yin and Yang and the Flowerpot Man"
    * Maciej Maleńczuk "Miasto Krakoff
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 03-13-2010 at 11:59 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  9. #59
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    Bo's square guitar

    As a boy a young Elias Bates fashioned a crude instrument called a diddley bow out of an old cigar box. A diddley bow is based on a single string instrument of African origin that consists of a wooden board or a wooden dowl, such as a broom handle, a piece of wire and a couple of screws to stretch it over. The cigar box gave the instrument some resonance. It is usually played using a slide, which can be fashioned from the neck of a wine or beer bottle. A jack knife could also make a nice slide.

    Not only did Elias Bates take his musical name from the diddley bow, he also used his cigar box instrument as inspiration for his personal guitar. As his fame as a musician grew, Gretsch guitars was all too happy to oblige him with a custom instrument that he dubbed The Twang Machine. It was made in 1958.




    Gretsch made him at least two more guitars which were based on the Cadillac fins. For all you young’uns out there, there was a time, back when most all cars were made in America. In the late 1950's America was entering the race to space and to help it along cars had to have fins.


    Gretsch now produces a reproduction of Bo’s famous instrument square guitar. Just like the original, the instrument is 17-3/4" x 9-1/4" x 2" and made of alder and 5-ply maple for it’s semi hollow body. It is finished with a bright red paint job and lacquer. The guitar is decked out with two FilterTron pickups, a tune-o-matic bridge and a Gretsch G tailpiece with gold hardware.


    They also produce a Bo Diddley Guitar under their Electromatic Brand. This one is not quite as fancy. It has a stop tail piece, a bolt on neck and chome hardware.


    http://uniqueguitar.blogspot.com/200...as-on-mid.html

    --------------------------------------------------
    BO DIDDLEY - The Originator

    "Have Guitar - Will Travel..."

    Around 1958, BO DIDDLEY built the world's first square guitar by taking the neck and the electrics off a Gretsch guitar and putting them onto a square body that he had constructed. Later that year he commissioned Gretsch's Brooklyn factory to make him another square guitar, which he nicknamed "Big B". Two decades later, and despite having it rebuilt twice and adding new electronic effects to it, "Big B" had become almost obsolete.

    We are very grateful to Chris Kinman of Kinman Guitar Electrix in Brisbane, Australia for supplying us with the following recollections of how he came to build his next square guitar, the one that BO DIDDLEY dubbed "The Mean Machine".

    "In 1978, Bo was touring Australia and picking up local bands to back him. In Brisbane he used Hombrey, with Ron Delbridge playing lead. Ron had one of my custom built guitars, and Bo took a shine to it, and asked where he got it. I was in my factory one Sunday afternoon just cleaning up and the phone rang. "BO DIDDLEY here", said a big black voice. I thought someone was playing a prank. I only became convinced when he said he liked Ron's guitar, and wanted one built as well.

    "I played with an authentic R&B band called The Roadrunners during the 60s, and Bo was a legend and a hero to me. It took a while to sink in that I was actually going to build him a guitar.

    "I had only 4 weeks to complete it before his tour finished. I didn't think building a rectangular shape would be so difficult, but it was. He wanted it fitted with various effect devices, and the wiring alone took about 8 hours, as I recall. The body was constructed from New Guinea Walnut with intense fiddle back figure; the last pieces I had. It was bound with cream plastic binding on both sides.

    "The neck was laminated with 5 ply of Honduras Mahogany, Silver Ash and New Guinea Rosewood, with an ebony fretboard. The neck was inclined to the body, (like a Les Paul), with an inclined headstock, and had a long tongue which finished under the tailpiece. The scale was 24 3/4 inches. I inlaid the KINMAN name in real mother-of-pearl into a black headstock overlay. I made the neck real fat, something to really get hold of, to suit his hands. He loved it!

    "The pickups were Gibson humbuckers. I tried DiMarzios and a few others, but the Gibsons definitely sounded better. All the electronics were taken from their original metal enclosures, and their circuit boards mounted in shielded cavities in the body of the guitar, with transparent covers so they could be seen. That made a very impressive sight. All the controls and signal routing switches were mounted through the wood on the face of the guitar, some 12 of them as I recall.

    "Another problem I ran into was the case. I couldn't find one, so I made one specially out of plywood and pine. It was a bit of a monster, built to withstand the torture of world tours, able to be dropped from an 8 story building, and run over by a bulldozer without serious injury to the guitar. Just as well Bo had big strong arms, it weighed a ton. I often wondered how many tennis elbows he got from lugging it around.
    http://members.tripod.com/originator_2/meanmachine.html

    -----------------------------------------
    Bo Didlley died June 2, 2008 and this was part of a nice summation from one of the press obituaries:

    The legendary singer and performer, known for his homemade square guitar, dark glasses and black hat, was an inductee into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, had a star on Hollywood's Walk of Fame, and received a lifetime achievement award in 1999 at the Grammy Awards. In recent years he also played for the elder President Bush and President Clinton.

    Diddley appreciated the honors he received, "but it didn't put no figures in my checkbook."

    "If you ain't got no money, ain't nobody calls you honey," he quipped.


    The name Bo Diddley came from other youngsters when he was growing up in Chicago, he said in a 1999 interview.

    "I don't know where the kids got it, but the kids in grammar school gave me that name," he said, adding that he liked it so it became his stage name. Other times, he gave somewhat differing stories on where he got the name. Some experts believe a possible source for the name is a one-string instrument used in traditional blues music called a diddley bow.

    His first single, "Bo Diddley," introduced record buyers in 1955 to his signature rhythm: bomp ba-bomp bomp, bomp bomp, often summarized as "shave and a haircut, two bits." The B side, "I'm a Man," with its slightly humorous take on macho pride, also became a rock standard.

    The company that issued his early songs was Chess-Checkers records, the storied Chicago-based labels that also recorded Chuck Berry and other stars.

    Howard Kramer, assistant curator of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, said in 2006 that Diddley's Chess recordings "stand among the best singular recordings of the 20th century."

    Diddley's other major songs included, "Say Man," "You Can't Judge a Book by Its Cover," "Shave and a Haircut," "Uncle John," "Who Do You Love?" and "The Mule."

    Diddley's influence was felt on both sides of the Atlantic. Buddy Holly borrowed the bomp ba-bomp bomp, bomp bomp rhythm for his song "Not Fade Away."

    The Rolling Stones' bluesy remake of that Holly song gave them their first chart single in the United States, in 1964. The following year, another British band, the Yardbirds, had a Top 20 hit in the U.S. with their version of "I'm a Man."

    Diddley was also one of the pioneers of the electric guitar, adding reverb and tremelo effects. He even rigged some of his guitars himself.

    "He treats it like it was a drum, very rhythmic," E. Michael Harrington, professor of music theory and composition at Belmont University in Nashville, Tenn., said in 2006.

    Many other artists, including the Who, Bruce Springsteen and Elvis Costello copied aspects of Diddley's style.

    Growing up, Diddley said he had no musical idols, and he wasn't entirely pleased that others drew on his innovations.

    "I don't like to copy anybody. Everybody tries to do what I do, update it," he said. "I don't have any idols I copied after."

    "They copied everything I did, upgraded it, messed it up. It seems to me that nobody can come up with their own thing, they have to put a little bit of Bo Diddley there," he said.

    Despite his success, Diddley claimed he only received a small portion of the money he made during his career. Partly as a result, he continued to tour and record music until his stroke. Between tours, he made his home near Gainesville in north Florida.

    "Seventy ain't nothing but a damn number," he told The Associated Press in 1999. "I'm writing and creating new stuff and putting together new different things. Trying to stay out there and roll with the punches. I ain't quit yet."


    Diddley, like other artists of his generations, was paid a flat fee for his recordings and said he received no royalty payments on record sales. He also said he was never paid for many of his performances.

    "I am owed. I've never got paid," he said. "A dude with a pencil is worse than a cat with a machine gun."

    In the early 1950s, Diddley said, disc jockeys called his type of music, "Jungle Music." It was Cleveland disc jockey Alan Freed who is credited with inventing the term "rock 'n' roll."

    Diddley said Freed was talking about him, when he introduced him, saying, "Here is a man with an original sound, who is going to rock and roll you right out of your seat."
    http://www.startribune.com/19456964.html



    I had no idea when I started this thread the depth of the history behind these lessons. It is incredibly interesting to me and I hope you find the research interesting. They are also very good lessons on point to the piece of history Joe is drawing from in my opinion.....relax and enjoy!
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:28 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  10. #60
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    Here are some links to videos Joe mentioned

    Johnny Otis performs his monster hit "Willie and the Hand Jive" on his TV show. Late fifties? with Marie Adams, the Three Tons of Joy, and Lionel Hampton.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEeeGMpM_Nk

    Buddy Holly - Not Fade Away
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=veyPHzxNjog

    Rolling Stones - Not fade away 1964 (they were so young!)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZ8xM...eature=related

    Ronnie Hawkins & The Hawks - Who do you love
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xk8r4...om=PL&index=13

    Bo Diddley&Ron Wood Who Do You Love?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqiHRYjePBk
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Before you do this lesson (if you haven't already) watch the master from back in the 50s....coily cords for miles and the foot work


    Bo Diddley - Hey, Bo Diddley and Bo Diddley

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HICsP...x=0&playnext=1


    THE BEST VIDEO OF ALL ON BO DIDDLEY
    Bo Diddley in his prime, doing what he did best ROCK OUT! He was doing this when Jimi Hendrix was in diapers. Awesome video!! (check out the EVH move at the 2 minute mark)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHs6f...eature=related
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 03-13-2010 at 06:55 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  12. #62

    Arrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfboy1 View Post
    Before you do this lesson (if you haven't already) watch the master from back in the 50s....coily cords for miles and the foot work


    Bo Diddley - Hey, Bo Diddley and Bo Diddley

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HICsP...x=0&playnext=1


    THE BEST VIDEO OF ALL ON BO DIDDLEY
    Bo Diddley in his prime, doing what he did best ROCK OUT! He was doing this when Jimi Hendrix was in diapers. Awesome video!! (check out the EVH move at the 2 minute mark)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHs6f...eature=related
    WoW...That was Great....


    Best Ever !


    Praise Be The Lord, My Rock, Who Trains My Hands For War, and My Fingers For Battle;


    My name is Michael Westen. I used to be a spy.
    Check out the "Triads & Hendrixian Double Stops" Study Group" Put in your 2 Cents

    http://truefire.com/forum/showthread...ot-Study-Group


  13. #63

    Default The 3 B's

    Hail, Hail, Wolfboy1,

    As Torr said, Wow indeed! Your expanded coverage of the Bo, Berry, and Beck lessons (vids and all) is totally on the case!

    Joe
    Last edited by Joe Deloro; 03-14-2010 at 01:35 AM.

  14. #64
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    Thanks for stopping by Joe and thanks for the kind words, its really a fun course you put together.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Buono "40 Day Rhythm Swat Camp"
    If you call "Not Fade Away" at a jam session, the rhythm guitar player is likely to break into a Bo Diddley-style strum which is the groove most bands set the song to but Holly's rhythm pattern is quite different. The Bo Diddley rhythm puts the accents on beats one, the and of two, and four in the first half of a two-bar figure, and beats two and three in the second bar. But, as you can see in the music below, Holly's "Not Fade Away" figure accents beats two, the and of three, and four in bar 1, and beats two and three in bar 2.

    Bars 3 and 4 reprise the first two bars, with an added peeow on beat four of bar 4. (Holly played the quick down glissandos in the song's intro, interludes, and outro, though it's absent in the verses.) The key to acing Holly's "Not Fade Away" riff is to strum the strings relatively hard on the accented beats (see the indications below the staff) and to use a feathery touch on the other beats particularly in bar 1, where beats three and the and of four should be more felt than heard. (The same is true in bar 3, which is identical to bar 1.) Fingering the chords and chord fragments as indicated will help you minimize unnecessary fret-hand movement.
    Link

    Wolfy - I mean this is a good way but, You seen to have way too much time to search the internet for this stuff. Not only do we get a breakdown of the lesson, but we get a cool little history lesson.

    BTW I love the Clave rhythm
    Honey, I'm spending money on guitars or women, ... your choice.

    If you take Satan for a ride, pretty soon he'll want to drive.


    Favorite Course - Blues Alchemy
    Working On - Fretboard Epiphanies & Jump Blues

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    Quote Originally Posted by rjbasque View Post
    Wolfy - I mean this is a good way but, You seen to have way too much time to search the internet for this stuff. Not only do we get a breakdown of the lesson, but we get a cool little history lesson.

    BTW I love the Clave rhythm
    Wife was gone this weekend

    Now on with the lessons for a bit....Buckeyes are in the Big Ten Tournament final at 3:30pm
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  17. #67
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    Claves R-1

    This is pretty straight forward rock and roll and I don't have much to add to Joe's lesson except:

    - I do like the pinky pull-offs of the G on the low E string. It's a good workout for that pinky and something that if you strengthen it you will use it more.

    - Damping or muting. Joe really uses 2 types of muting it appears. He is using the side of his right hand on the strings in the bridge area and his left hand fingers over the strings where he forms the chords. Both work and you can coordinate them however you want but when doing scratches you gotta mute.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  18. #68
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    Claves R-2

    Power chords - interesting stuff:
    In music, a power chord About this sound Play (help·info) (also fifth chord) is a chord-like pseudo-triad consisting of only the root note of the chord, the fifth above it, and normally the octave above the root. The power chord is usually played on electric guitar, and typically through an amplification process that imparts distortion. Power chords are a key element of many styles of rock music. It is not a true chord per se, due to the fact that it only has two unique notes (by the rule of "octave equivalency"), while true chords must have three or more.

    Cool Science
    When a normal chord (for example, a major or minor chord) consisting of three or more different degrees of the scale is played through distortion, the number of different frequencies generated, and the complex ratios between them, can cause the resulting sound to be messy and indistinct.

    However, in a power chord, the ratio between the frequencies of the root and fifth is simply 3:2 (see interval) . When played through distortion, this leads to the production of harmonics closely related in frequency to the original two notes, producing a more coherent sound. Additionally, the spectrum of the sound is expanded in both directions, producing a richer, more subjectively 'powerful' sound than the undistorted signal. With large amounts of distortion, the fundamental can appear to be an octave lower than the root note of the chord played without distortion, again giving a more bassy and powerful sound.

    Even when played without distortion, the simple ratios between the harmonics in the notes of a power chord can give a stark and powerful sound.

    Power chords also have the added advantage of being relatively easy to play (see "Fingering" below), allowing fast chord changes and easy incorporation into melodies and riffs.

    History
    There is disagreement over which was the first record to feature power chords. Link Wray is commonly cited as having introduced power chords with his hit 1958 instrumental "Rumble". Wray used a pencil to punch holes into the loudspeaker of his amplifier in order to replicate a distortion effect first improvised at a show in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Wray pioneered electric guitar distortions, like overdrive and fuzz, and was the first guitarist to use power chords to play a song's melody.

    However, power chords can also be found in earlier, less commercially successful recordings. Robert Palmer has argued that blues guitarists Willie Johnson and Pat Hare, both of whom played for Sun Records in the early 1950s, were the true originators of the power chord, citing as evidence Johnson's playing on Howlin' Wolf's "How Many More Years" (recorded 1951) and Hare's playing on James Cotton's "Cotton Crop Blues" (recorded 1954).

    A later hit song built around power chords was "You Really Got Me" by the Kinks, released in 1964.This song clearly demonstrates the fast power chord changes that would become typical of heavy rock riffs
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_chord

    The lesson
    Other than Power chords Joe uses an alternating clave' rhythm in this second part. You have to listen for the grove but the original but an emphasis on the 2nd and 3rd beat of the second measure (shave and a haircut 2 bits)

    When Joe alternates the new variation puts the emphasis on the 3rd and 4th beats. There is an extra scratch in front of the emphasis and no pause (rest) after the fourth beat....

    Link Wray - Rumble:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9ezn...eature=related
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 03-14-2010 at 02:52 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  19. #69

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    I have been working on the clave rhythm lessons but I am not getting the rhythm exactly correct. I would have liked Joe to demonstrate it at a super slow speed. I can come close but I can hear that there is a difference.

    I looked around on youtube and on the SWAT lesson, but I am still missing something. I am thinking to get a BoDiddley cd and play it for awhile pretty much non-stop to get the rhythm into my brain.

    I have realized that not being able to read a piece of rhythm in standard notation and being able to play it is not a good thing. Another opportunity to develop my skills!

  20. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by charles View Post
    I have been working on the clave rhythm lessons but I am not getting the rhythm exactly correct. I would have liked Joe to demonstrate it at a super slow speed. I can come close but I can hear that there is a difference.

    I looked around on youtube and on the SWAT lesson, but I am still missing something. I am thinking to get a BoDiddley cd and play it for awhile pretty much non-stop to get the rhythm into my brain.

    I have realized that not being able to read a piece of rhythm in standard notation and being able to play it is not a good thing. Another opportunity to develop my skills!
    Frank Vignola does a lesson on the clave in Vamps, Jams & Improvs course. It should be up on Truefire TV somewhere. Its a tough one

    Yep here it is http://truefire.com/tftv/index.html?...e=vamps/fv09r1
    Last edited by Leedelta; 03-15-2010 at 06:48 AM.

  21. #71

    Arrow

    Thanks Lee

    That’s another great source...
    I'm like Charles I've always struggled wit git-in it Right...

    Hey Charles I have found that using the PowerTabs to slow down the rhythms will help too...

    If you use any jamming software that uses midi, Export the file out of PowerTabs then load it into the player , you can loop one or two beats of a measure and build from there..if that makes sense...
    It works for me...the only problem is the PowerTabs lack human feel. But it’s close...
    If you don’t have any Midi Player type software check the Net…some free ones out there (just limited to what they can do)


    Best Ever !


    Praise Be The Lord, My Rock, Who Trains My Hands For War, and My Fingers For Battle;


    My name is Michael Westen. I used to be a spy.
    Check out the "Triads & Hendrixian Double Stops" Study Group" Put in your 2 Cents

    http://truefire.com/forum/showthread...ot-Study-Group


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    Clave' S1 and S2

    Both of these are cool little solos but the first is my definite favorite. I really like the way Joe picks up the rhythm into his lead in bars 18-19-20 and 21.

    This is one thing that can be so effective in lead playing. It's not just the notes you are playing but the rhythm you are using. As Leee mentioned Frank Vignola's course is another great course for rhythm and this is one thing he pounds on...get with the rhythm (and drink green tea)

    Really douple stops and chord fragments can really improve your lead breaks if you use them right. Notice how Joe uses them....an E chord over a C#min, an Eb over a B. It works and when incorporated with the rhythm sounds phenomenal!

    He starts off with one of those cool rakes again

    Now he moves into the E minor pentatonic scale and then throws in the 6th from the E major scale (a C#)



    So we have an E minor pentatonic
    an E minor pentatonic with the 6th or C# Joe adds in.
    an E Minor pentatonic with all the C#s in that area added as a visual reference.

    Next in a couple of places Joe slips into the E major scale.



    Joe if you read this I have a question.

    I notice you are jamming over the E minor scale in most places but hit on the E major when playing over the E chord at times....
    1) Am I correct in that observation and
    2) Is that a typical way to merge minor and major scales?

    For another example playing over a 12 bar blues jam in A
    I = A (A minor pentatonic 1st time around then A major pentatonic)
    IV= D (A minor pentatonic)
    V = E (A minor pentatonic)

    I have never been very good at mixing major and minor pentatonic scales and this is something I noticed in your playing and wondered if it was kind of a standard way to operate.
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:26 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Solo 2

    bends and rakes and slides oh my!

    Well plus... hammer-ons, damps, pull-offs, postion shifts etc. Lots of techniques and not that difficult. Notice this is in a different key. Joe says it takes after Peter Green. Peter started Fleetwood Mac (or at least one of the founding members) and is one of Bekaybe's favorite players. He kind of went a bit bonkers and quit playing guitar for awhile. Another Rock and Roll casualty.

    Peter Green: Need Your Love So Bad
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxeQK...eature=related

    Peter Green: Oh Well
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KE4HG...eature=related

    Peter Green: World Keep On Turnin (early version
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rxux5...eature=related

    And my favorite
    The Green Manalishi (the original)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qoSbr...eature=related

    Now, when the day goes to sleep and the full moon looks
    The night is so black that the darkness cooks
    Don't you come creepin' around - makin' me do things I don't want to

    Can't believe that you need my love so bad
    Come sneakin' around tryin' to drive me mad
    Bustin' in on my dreams - making me see things I don't wanna see



    'Cause you're da Green Manalishi with the two prong crown
    All my tryin' is up - all your bringin' is down
    Just taking my love then slippin' away
    Leavin' me here just tryin' to keep from following you


    G minor pentatonic for reference:



    Now my first "issue" with the course....
    The jam tracks, are not jam tracks. They are way to short. As my wife says...."give me a good 3 minutes and maybe I can make something happen!"
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:26 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  24. #74
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    Stone Berry.

    This is very basic Rock n Roll, probably the easiest most fundamental lesson on the disc (I'm not sure as I haven't done them all yet)

    The "Stone" in this lesson refers to Keith Richards the wrinkled, wizened, human riff factory and of course "Berry" is again Chuck Berry.


    Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943)

    First....this is a great interview and worth a read:
    http://pierresetparoles.blogspot.com...orld-1999.html

    Here is a few quotes from it that are right on point to this lesson title.....

    GW: You've played with nearly all the guitar greats: Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Chuck Berry, John Lee Hooker, Buddy Guy . . .
    RICHARDS: Lucky old me. I know, it's amazing.
    GW: Is there a key, for you, to meshing with another guitarist? What's your secret?
    RICHARDS: First of all, you really have to want it. I knew all those guys' stuff so well. Their styles. So it was, "Just give me a crack at it, man." For me, to be second guitar to Chuck Berry on Hail! Hail! Rock `n' Roll, I looked up and realized, "**** man, when you started, you'd have died and gone to heaven. This was all you ever wanted." But what I found out is that all of the great players are basically such gentlemen. B.B. and Muddy Waters, both straight up guys. They've got nothing to fear. They always encourage. They're always concerned about other people. They're never self centered. When I look back and think, "****, I played with those guys," that's enough. I don't want no money. I mean, thanks for the money, but to have Muddy Waters say to you, "Hey, show me that lick you did..." Everybody's a perennial teenager when it comes to **** like that.
    GW: Were any of those guys a little more frightening than others?
    RICHARDS: Well, Chuck's difficult. He's just a loner and he doesn't have many friends. That's why he has a little chip on his shoulder. But if you get him going, he's another gent. An absolute prize. Energy and knowledge. Just a lot of mood swings. That's the only difference between him and the other cats. And he's hard to handle at times. Which is why he's never kept a band together since he got rid of the original one: Johnny Johnson and Ebby Harding and Willie [Dixon]. And he never made a record that sounds as good, either. A little cheap too, that way. That's why he plays with the worst band in town whenever he turns up. But at the same time he's a sweet guy. He's just more fragile.



    Musical career:Guitar playing

    Richards's guitar playing shows his fascination with chords and rhythm; he conspicuously avoids flamboyant virtuosity in favour of riffs Chris Spedding described as "direct, incisive and unpretentious". Richards prefers to play in tandem with another guitarist and has always toured with one, and since 1969 he has always toured with a keyboardist.

    Chuck Berry has been a constant inspiration for Richards. Richards and Jagger played many Berry numbers with the first band they played in, Little Boy Blue and the Blue Boys; and it was Richards and Jagger who introduced Berry's songs to The Rolling Stones' early repertoire. Jimmy Reed and Muddy Waters records were another early source of inspiration, and the basis for the style of interwoven lead and rhythm guitar that Richards developed with Brian Jones. In the late 1960s, Brian Jones's declining interest in guitar led to Richards recording all guitar parts on many tracks, including slide guitar, which had been Jones's specialty in the band's early years. Jones's replacement guitarist Mick Taylor worked with The Rolling Stones from 1969 to 1974, and Taylor's virtuosity at lead guitar led to a much more pronounced separation between lead and rhythm guitar roles, notably onstage. In 1975 Taylor was replaced by Ronnie Wood, marking a return to the style of guitar interplay that he and Richards call "the ancient art of weaving".

    The 1967/68 break in the Rolling Stones' touring allowed Richards experiment with open tunings. Open tunings were commonly used for slide guitar, but Richards explored their use in rhythm playing, developing an innovative and distinctive style of syncopated and ringing I-IV chording that can be heard on "Street Fighting Man" and "Start Me Up". Richards has used various open tunings (and has always regularly used standard tuning as well) but particularly favours a five-string variant of open G tuning using GDGBD unencumbered by a low 6th string. Several of his Telecasters are tuned this way (see the "Guitars" section below), and this tuning is prominent on Rolling Stones tracks and concert renditions including "Honky Tonk Women", "Brown Sugar" and "Start Me Up".

    Richards considers acoustic guitar to be the basis for his playing, and has said: "...you're never going to get the full potential out of an electric, because you lose that touch."Richards's acoustic guitar is featured on tracks throughout the Rolling Stones' career, including hits like "Not Fade Away", "Brown Sugar", "Beast of Burden" and "Almost Hear You Sigh". All the guitars on the studio version of "Street Fighting Man" are Richards on acoustic, distorted by overloading a small cassette recorder microphone, a technique also used on "Jumping Jack Flash".

    Richards has described his role in the Rolling Stones as "oiling the machinery". Ian Stewart called him the musical leader of the Rolling Stones, and both Bill Wyman and Ronnie Wood have noted that while other bands follow the drummer, the Rolling Stones follow Richards. Wyman stated in 1978: "[O]nstage you have to follow Keith. You have no way of not following him."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keith_Richards

    Here' a little lesson on Truefire's own site in reference to Keith's open G tuning (it's free)
    http://truefire.com/list.html?store=...sons&item=6170

    A lesson from Guitar player Magazine....audio and tab at the link...


    In addition to being the poster child for rockers with attitude, Keith Richards is one of the greatest rhythm guitarists ever to strap on a 6-string. Or more accurately, a 5-string. Richards crafts many of his most memorable riffs using a modified open-G tuning, which involves removing his sixth string and tuning strings 5-1 to G, D, G, B, D.

    “The whole idea of getting rid of the sixth string in the open tuning was having the root on the bottom,” he told GP’s Tom Wheeler in 1983. “You can get a drone going, so you have the effect of two chords playing against each other. One hangs on because you’ve just got to move one finger—or two at the most—to change the chord, so you’ve still got the other strings ringing. It’s a big sound.”

    To get a handle on Richards open-G riffage, try Ex. 1, a two-bar phrase inspired by the intro to “Brown Sugar.” Bar 2 features an essential “Keef” voicing, Fadd2. An amalgam of F and C major triads, this is the grip Richards’ describes as “two chords playing against each other.”

    Distilled from key moves Richards plays in “Start Me Up,” Ex. 2 revisits the interplay between C and Fadd2 we encountered in the previous example, and also includes a classic R&B pattern. This Bb5-Bb6-Bb5 shift ties Richards to his greatest hero, Chuck Berry, who used such chunky sounds to power many hits, including “Roll Over Beethoven,” “Johnny B. Goode,” and “Memphis, Tennessee.”

    Open G isn’t limited to churning rhythm riffs. Spun from the country-fried licks Richards plays in the intro to “Honky Tonk Women,” Ex. 3 illustrates the tuning’s melodic side. The droning first string provides a backdrop for the twangy bends, releases, and seesaw pentatonic line.

    In terms of tone, Richards favors a blend of grit and chime. “I’ve always found that a really good distortion needs to come from two different places. You want some distortion and some clarity at the same time where you need it, so I’d rather put my guitar through two amps and overload one of them.”
    http://www.guitarplayer.com/article/...rds/Mar-05/556



    I love this little article from GP as well.....

    Keith Richards tells the stories behind his 10 all-time-favorite Rolling Stones riffs.




    Satisfaction

    When I wrote the song, I didn’t think of that particular riff as the big guitar riff. That all fell into place at RCA [recording studio in L.A.] when Gibson dumped on me one of those first Fuzz-Tone pedals. I actually thought of that guitar line as a horn riff. The way Otis Redding ended up doing it is probably closer to my original conception for the song. It’s an obvious horn riff. And when this new Fuzz Tone pedal arrived in the studio from the local dealership or something, I said, “Oh, this is good. It’s got a bit of sustain, so I can use it to sketch out the horn line.” So we left the track and went back out on the road. And two weeks later I hear it on the radio. I said, “No, that was just a demo!” They said, “No, it’s a hit.” At least Otis got it right. Our version was a demo for Otis.

    Mother’s Little Helper

    The main riff is a 12-string with a slide on it. It’s played slightly Orientalish. This was even before sitars were used in rock music. It just needed something to make it twang, ’cause otherwise the song was quite vaudeville in a way. And it was just one of those things where somebody walked in with it and we went, “Look, it’s an electric 12-string.” It was just some gashed-up job. God knows where it came from or where it went, but I put it together with a bottleneck and we had a riff that tied the whole song together. There’s probably some gypsy influence in there somewhere.

    Paint it Black

    Brian [Jones, Rolling Stones founder and Richards’ original coguitarist] got into the sitar and used it on a few things, like “Paint It Black.” I found it an interesting instrument, the idea of the sympathetic strings underneath that resonate to the strings on top. But as far as actually playing it—leave that to the Indians. There’s just something about the strings; they were too thin. But Brian loved to dodge around and play dulcimers, mandolins… things like that. [Former bassist] Bill Wyman was also instrumental to the sound of “Paint It Black” by adding the organ pedals. That song is another one of those semi-gypsy melodies we used to come up with back then. I don’t know where they come from. Must be in the blood.

    Jumping Jack Flash

    “Jumping Jack Flash” comes from this guy, Jack Dyer, who was my gardener—an old English yokel. Mick and I were in my house down in the south of England. We’d been up all night; the sky was just beginning to go gray. It was pissing down raining, if I remember rightly. Mick and I were sitting there, and suddenly Mick starts up. He hears these great footsteps, these great rubber boots—slosh, slosh, slosh—going by the window. He said. “What’s that?” And I said, “Oh, that’s Jack. That’s jumpin’ Jack.” We had my guitar in open tuning, and I started to fool around with that. [singing] “Jumpin’ Jack...” and Mick says, “Flash.” He’d just woken up. And suddenly we had this wonderful alliterative phrase. So he woke up and we knocked it together.

    On the record, I played a Gibson Hummingbird [acoustic] tuned to either open E or open D with a capo. And then I added another [acoustic] guitar over the top, but tuned to Nashville tuning [tuned like a 12-string guitar without the lower octave strings]. I learned that from somebody in George Jones’ band, in San Antonio in ’63. We happened to be playing the World Teen Fair together. This guy in a Stetson and cowboy boots showed me how to do it, with the different strings, to get that high ring. I was picking up tips.

    Sympanthy for the Devil

    Mick brought that to the studio as a very Bob Dylanish kind of folk guitar song, and it ended up as a damned samba. I think that’s the strength of the Stones: give them a song half raw and they’ll cook it.

    Street Fighting Man

    When we went in the studio, we just couldn’t reproduce the sound of the original demo I did on cassette. So we played the cassette through an extension speaker and I played along with it—we just shoved a microphone into an acoustic and overdubbed it onto the track from the cassette. Then we put it on a four-track, played it back, and at the same time the guitar was going on, I had [session keyboard great] Nicky Hopkins playing a bit of piano and Charlie [Watts, drums] just shuffling in the background. Then we put drums on it and added another guitar while he was doing that, and we just kept layering it.

    At that time I was into really compressing the acoustic guitar by running it through the early Phillips and Norelco cassette recorders and really overloading them. They came with a little plastic mic and I’d slam that right down into the acoustic guitar. I did that on “Jumping Jack Flash,” too. With all of those songs, I wanted the drive and dryness of an acoustic guitar, but I still wanted to distort it.

    On “Street Fighting Man,” there’s one six-string and one five-string acoustic. They’re both in open tunings, but then there’s a lot of capo work. There are lots of layers of guitars on “Street Fighting Man,” so it’s difficult to say what you’re hearing on there. ’Cause I tried eight different guitars, and which ones were used in the final version I couldn’t say.

    Gimmie Shelter

    That was done on some nameless Australian full-bodied acoustic [a Maton]. It looked like a copy of the Gibson model that Chuck Berry used. The thing had all been revarnished and painted out, but it just sounded great. Some guy crashed out at my pad for a couple of days, then suddenly split in a hurry and left that guitar behind, like, “take care of this for me.” I certainly did. At the very last note of the take, the whole neck fell off. You can hear it on the original track. That guitar had just that one little quality for that specific thing. In a way, it was quite poetic that it died at the end of the track.

    Can't You Hear Me Knocking

    On that song, my fingers just landed in the right place and I discovered a few things about that [five-string, open G] tuning that I’d never been aware of. I think I realized that even as I was cutting the track. And then that jam at the end—we didn’t even know they were still taping. We thought we’d finished. We were just rambling and they kept the tape rolling. It was only when we heard the playback we realized: “Oh they kept it going. Okay, fade it out there... no wait, a little bit more, a bit more...“ Basically, we realized we had two bits of music: there’s the song and there’s the jam.

    Miss You

    That was basically Mick’s song. He said, “Let’s try this disco **** out.” I think he’d been to too many nightclubs, actually. The guitar riff basically suggested itself from the melody Mick was singing. I just shadowed that and ran it behind the voice. It’s just a piece of fun, that song. It can get really funky if you get the right tempo and slam it in. Basically, you’re sitting on Charlie on that.

    Start Me Up

    I was convinced that was a reggae song. Everybody else was convinced of that. “It’s reggae, man.” We did 45 takes like that. But then on a break I just played that guitar riff, not even really thinking much about it; we did a take rocking away and then went back to work and did another 15 reggae takes. Five years later, Mick discovered that one rock take in the middle of the tape and realized how good it was. The fact that I missed “Start Me Up” for five years is one of my disappointments. It just went straight over my head. But you can’t catch everything

    Stay tuned for some videos
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 03-16-2010 at 11:39 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    First (before videos) take a look at Keiths most famous guitars. This info is from a fans diehard site that is very informative called "The Keith Shrine"
    http://members.tripod.com/blue_lena/guitar2.html

    His traveling arsenal - Bigger Bang Tour


    'Micawber' is probably one of Keith’s most famous trademark guitars and is a 1953 Fender Telecaster Blonde. Micawber is named after a Charles Dickens character, no one is exactly sure why. Keith’s had this guitar since Exile On Main St. This guitar is kept in Open G tuning (G,D,G,B,D) low to high with no capo, and of course has the famous 5 strings with the 6th string removed (as do all his open G tuned guitars).


    'Malcolm' is a 1954 Fender Telecaster with natural finish. Also kept in Open G tuning.


    'Sonny' is a 1966 Fender Telecaster Sunburst. Johnny Starbuck says it’s called “Sonny” due to the Sunburst finish, and should probably be named “Sunny” instead, but it’s not. This guitar is in Open G.


    'Dice' is a 1957 Gibson Les Paul TV Model Yellow. Starbuck says it’s a double cutaway and is always used on Midnight Rambler with a capo on the 7th fret. This guitar is kept in standard tuning.


    'Dwight' is a White 1964 Gibson ES-345 Stereo. Starbuck said, “When we got DWIGHT we had already had the black ES-355 and the new ES-345 looked so much like it that Pierre (de Beauport, Keith’s guitar tech) started calling it "The White One" and that got sort of shortened to "Da White One" which finally became DWIGHT 1". This guitar is kept in standard tuning.


    A 1959 Black Gibson ES-355 Mono (some folks say it’s a ’60, but Pierre De Beauport, Keith’s guitar tech, says it’s a ’59, so we tend to believe him!). This guitar is kept in standard tuning.


    A 1975 Black Telecaster Custom. This guitar is kept in Open G tuning.


    • 'Micawber' is used on songs like Brown Sugar and Honky Tonk Women.

    • The ES-355 Mono Black Keith uses on Satisfaction, Oh No Not You Again, She's So Cold, Nearness Of You and Little T&A.

    • 'Malcolm' is used on You Got Me Rockin’.

    • 'Sonny' is famous for Tumbling Dice, You Can't Always Get What You Want

    • 'Dice' is used on Midnight Rambler with a capo on the 7th fret

    • 'Dwight' is heard on Let’s Spend The Night Together and Get Off My Cloud

    • Tele Custom is used on Jumping Jack Flash most of the time

    • ‘57 Stratocaster is used on Miss You and Under My Thumb. Keith, Mick and Ronnie all play Stratocasters on Miss You.

    • ’64 Martin Acoustic is used for Keith’s ballads like The Worst, as well as Ruby Tuesday, Angie, etc.

    • 2006 Guild Custom 10 String Acoustic is used on Wild Horses, in place of the 12 string Keith used to use before.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  26. #76
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    Joe mentions a couple of videos by the Rolling Stones on this lessons write-up

    Route 66:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyhkBg8wOBo

    Let it Rock (nice little nod to Chuck for the intro)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06iwBdi736o

    It's Only Rock and Roll (but I Like It)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhHODhTIvgo

    Sweet Little 16 (yep, they like Chuck Berry)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4bcXcyoYsU

    Now here is a classic little clip of Chuck and Keith from the film "Hail, Hail, Rock N Roll"
    I think despite Keith's kind words, Chuck is really a bit of an ass (you will see it in this clip)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ClgtoM2RwQY

    Chuck and Keith Doing Roll Over Beethoven. Keith is actually kind of cleaned up and in a suit jacket!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YeYF0qZBhYY&feature=fvw
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  27. #77
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    Played through StoneBerry R1 and R2

    As I said earlier R1 is the basics, and to be a good rhythm player you gotta nail this. Get that rhythm down cold. It is very basic but it is the backbone that will support your song.

    R2 has a nice variation or two. I have never played it quite like that and sounds nice. Now part of my bag-o-tricks. One thing I would add to Joes comments....If you are playing rhythm be consistent. Don't just throw in variations here and there. Play maybe one variation for the verse one for the chorus etc. Keep it tight and simple.

    One variation I like to do is very common with Skynyrd and ZZTop


    etc. etc.......Two beats each shape.

    I don't know if I portrayed that right but, you are throwing in a b7th on top the 6th. I generally use my first finger on the root, my third finger on the 5th and my pinky alternating between the 6th and flat 7.

    Or as per the picture
    First finger on 5
    Third finger on 7
    Pinky on 9 and 10
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:24 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  28. #78

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    Great stuff Jeff! I had forgotten how much I like the Stones.

    Even with the simplicity of the R1 lesson, I still found a technical detail to challenge me. When I do the boogie woogie 5th to the 6th with my pinky, my hand is quite arched over the fretboard to keep my fingertips straight. It is then a major shift to finger the whole dominant chord. (Sorry for the minor joke.)

    I hitched up my strap a notch, but I think that it is largely a hand strength/positioning problem.

  29. #79
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    You know Charles that is a whole new thread idea right there....how low do you wear your guitar?
    I would say I am about average maybe a tinge on the high side. To fess-up a bit I would probably wear it even higher but there is a point when comfort is less a priority than dorkiness. We all know R&R is attitude and image first, ability second, truly no one wants to be the Gomer Pyle of the rock scene
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:23 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  30. #80

    Arrow

    Great Photos,,, I feel young again.. Thanks

    I Have never been a big Boogie Woogie type of player ..But playing it with the A7 barr chord I really like.. Especially when he adds the sus move ,,,you can come up with all kinds of moves going from the D(4) to the F#(6) and G(b7) on the higher strings..

    My guitar hangs where it hurts the least. .if that makes sense. Too low and it kills my shoulder Too High it Kills my shoulder...Now I feel Old again


    Best Ever !


    Praise Be The Lord, My Rock, Who Trains My Hands For War, and My Fingers For Battle;


    My name is Michael Westen. I used to be a spy.
    Check out the "Triads & Hendrixian Double Stops" Study Group" Put in your 2 Cents

    http://truefire.com/forum/showthread...ot-Study-Group


  31. #81
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    A night off from playing....had to watch "Zombieland" with my kid.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  32. #82
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    Okay Stone Berry S-1

    A tidy little bit of lead work to outline the 7th chords according to Joe. When he gets into the breakdown he says something to the effect

    "THis chord shape is a D shape making us think of A7." ????
    Okay I was struggling with understanding the shapes and what chords he was playing (should have been on the tab). Here is what I think he played around the 55 sec mark:



    Okay the first and last chords are A7s. One of you chord gurus out there tell me what the other two are as I am woefully inadequate in the chord naming dept.

    1) A7 (D shape? 9th fret)
    2) ?
    3) ?
    4) A7 (E shape? 5th fret)
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:23 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Okay next is described as a "Theme and Variation" phrase by Joe. Kind of like a "call and response" with a theme I guess

    Look at this A7 chord:

    I pulled the 8 and 9 out to the side. These are the 2 notes that make up the "theme" an E and G.

    So a little refresher:the E (9 above) is the 6th and the G (8 above is the b7)
    Key of A =

    A1 (W) B2 (W) C#3 (H) D4 (H) E5 (W) F#6 (W) G#7 (H) A8

    Blue = interval
    Red = distance
    Key = A major

    Therefore a G represents a b7 because a regular 7th interval would be a Whole step to the G# not a Half step to the G

    A little to much review maybe but if I don't repeat these things to myself every now and then I forget them
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:22 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Now to finish out the lick Joe does 3 things...

    1) A walk up over the D7

    2) A very cool little walk back down over the A7

    3) and little chord outlines to finish. Notice he sort of outlines the A7 chord notes over the E5 backing chord.
    The 2 chords have an "E" note in common but it still sounds really good here why is that? (Help)

    I agree with Joe this lick seriously hearkens back to Credence Clearwater Revival.....
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JacHyPaEwDc
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:22 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  35. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfboy1 View Post
    Okay Stone Berry S-1

    A tidy little bit of lead work to outline the 7th chords according to Joe. When he gets into the breakdown he says something to the effect

    "THis chord shape is a D shape making us think of A7." ????
    Okay I was struggling with understanding the shapes and what chords he was playing (should have been on the tab). Here is what I think he played around the 55 sec mark:

    Okay the first and last chords are A7s. One of you chord gurus out there tell me what the other two are as I am woefully inadequate in the chord naming dept.

    1) A7 (D shape? 9th fret)
    2) ?
    3) ?
    4) A7 (E shape? 5th fret)
    It's a fairly typical Delta blues/Robert Johnson run from one 7th chord inversion to the next down the neck. If you take off the D string notes, I am sure you can see/hear it. Adding the D string notes makes the second chord an A diminished and the third a B minor flat 5th. The B chord acts similar to a fully diminished chord and with the A in the bass keeps the tonality in A.

    At least I think so.
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:20 PM.

  36. #86
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    Thanks Charles.

    A little side note

    Joe Deloro, guitar instructor and transcriber extraordinaire!
    His web site:
    http://www.joedeloro.com/

    Transcription books you might have...
    Led Zeppelin note for note I-V
    Eagles: Hell freezes Over
    etc.

    Awesome work Joe!
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  37. #87
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    I was cleaning up a bit since I'm off today and all next week and I found this little known treasure.



    I don't think it's still available but maybe TF has a few copies laying around (I shall find out). It's powertab, .pdf and .mp3 only but if you like Eric Clapton you might like this.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  38. #88
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    Stone Berry S-2

    First check out Charlie Musselwhite's page, wow this guy is blues...
    http://www.charliemusselwhite.com/?page=home
    There is a great harp tune playin when you get there.


    Born: January 31, 1944

    Charlie Musselwhite - harmonica, vocalist

    Charlie Musselwhite seemed destined to be a bluesman. Born in Mississippi, the cradle of the blues, in 1944, Charlie moved to Memphis at an early age and became immersed in the city's diverse musical culture. While Charlie soaked up the music of Memphis with the enthusiasm of a true devotee, it was the blues that caught his soul. In his teens, he befriended several of Memphis' legendary traditional bluesmen, including guitarist Furry Lewis, Will Shade and the surviving members of the Memphis Jug Band. It wasn't long before Charlie began sitting in with his more experienced friends, and establishing a name for himself.

    When Charlie was 18, he had an awakening. Music wasn't paying the rent, so for $50 a trip, Charlie would run moonshine whiskey from remote country stills into downtown Memphis, and his bosses would distribute it to dozens of drive-in burger joints around town. When the state police followed him home one day, Charlie decided it was time for a change of profession. The next day, he packed up and headed north on Highway 51 to try his luck in Chicago.

    With the intent on finding a factory job in the Windy City, he instead found urban blues in all of its soulful glory. He hung out in the smoky blues clubs on the city's South and West sides and frequently sat in with legends like Little Walter, Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf. He also worked as a band member with Big Joe Williams, J.B. Hutto, Big Walter Horton, Johnny Young, Robert Nighthawk and Floyd Jones. “Coming to Chicago was like walking into Fat City,” says Charlie. “These guys inspired me. They gave me an incentive to find my own sound.”

    Charlie remembers all of those rough and tumble years that, he says, “toughened me up”, performing at South Side clubs for a dollar or two. “My feet would be wet from walking in the snow,” he recalls. “I had great big holes in my shoes and I remember that really well...once you've been there you don't forget.”

    Charlie's sound was firmly rooted in Memphis and Chicago-style blues, but it was also inspired by the high energy of rock 'n' roll. In the mid-sixties, Charlie and Paul Butterfield tapped a whole new audience of young rock fans who were drawn to their high-energy style of blues harp. In 1966, Charlie's crossover popularity was rewarded. Charlie signed with Vanguard and recorded the classic album “Stand Back.” It was one of the first blues albums marketed to the rock audience and, along with his subsequent albums in the late '60s and early '70s, established Charlie as a worldwide touring talent. As one critic wrote at the time, “Charlie Musselwhite is the natural born heir to carry the torch for the big city blues tradition.”

    After recording three excellent albums for Vanguard, which by the way are available in a compilation reissue, Charlie moved to the San Francisco Bay Area, where he still lives. Over the next two decades, he recorded for numerous labels. Blind Pig has reissued one classic album that captured Charlie in one of his most creative periods, “The Harmonica According To Charlie Musselwhite.”(1979) This material has never before appeared on compact disc. On this recording, Charlie offers a superb master class in blues harmonica style and performance, recording 13 tunes in 13 different keys.

    Charlie did many albums for many labels through the years. A few highlights were the ones he did for Alligator in the ‘90’s as; “Ace of Harps,” (’90) “Signature,” (’91) and “In My Time.” (’93) He went into a different direction in 1999 with his release of “Continental Drifter.” There are two sets of musicians on the album one being the Cuban players which give a Buena Vista feel to some of the cuts. It proved to be a well received innovative project.

    After signing with Telarc Blues in 2002, he continued exploring his musical roots by releasing “One Night in America.” The disc exposed Musselwhite's innate interest in country music. “Sanctuary,” a rock and soul excursion, released in 2004, was Musselwhite's first record for Real World. He then followed up in 2006 with “Delta Hardware.” Recorded with his road band, it has the feeling of motion along with its looking into the past, which for Charlie is all the way back into the original Delta Blues. He plays this music with an authenticity that only comes from experience.

    Such a long an distinguished carrer has not been without accolades garnered along the way. With 18 W.C. Handy awards to his credit and 6 Grammy nominations, he is firmly entrenched in musical history. Musselwhite has also been honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award from The Monterey Blues Festival and the San Javier Jazz Festival in Spain and the Mississippi Governor's Award for Excellence in the Arts. Perhaps most meaningful to him personally, in 1987, he conquered a long-running battle with alcoholism.

    Musselwhite's version of the blues ventures far beyond conventional honky-tonk as he is simply interested in music with feeling, as he puts it, “music from the heart”: “For me, it's about the feeling, and connecting with people. And blues, if it's real blues, is loaded with feeling. And it ain't about technique either, it's about truth, connecting to the truth and communicating with people.”



    Unfortunately I could not find "I've seen trouble" referenced by Joe. Too many "Trouble I've Seen" links and "I've seen...." links. If anybody finds it post.
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:21 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  39. #89
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    Well this first variation sounds great and is really built off the A7 and D7 chords.

    The first form Joe mentions is the 12th fret A7 in the "A" form
    Then the 10th fret A7 in the "C" form and finally ends up on the last shape referenced in this "tinylicks" diagram which is
    10th fret A
    12 fret 5th or E
    12th fret b7 or G

    then he throws in the b3rd or C note on the 13th fret B string.



    then here is the 10th fret "E" shape D7 probably everyone knows but is kind of worth looking at in contrast with the "C" form A7 to see where all the notes are:



    Now take a listen to James Burton's guitar on what I think is his original recording of Suzie Q (some cool photos in this vid)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKuu6...eature=related
    There are a couple of photo's of James with Elvis, and indeed they played together at times and is kind of a nice connection with the next set of lessons.....

    Here is a link to John Fogerty's "Suzie Q" in printable tab:
    http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/...uzie_q_tab.htm

    Here is a link to James Burton's solo on "Hello Mary-Lou" in Guitar pro only (it's really good IMHO):
    http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/...guitar_pro.htm
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:20 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  40. #90

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    Hey Wolfboy1,

    Great coverage on Stone Berry and all related artists! The Musselwhite tune you mentioned you couldn't find is actually called, "I Had Trouble." It's on his Sanctuary album, and features Charlie Sexton on guitar.

    Best,

    Joe
    Attached Images Attached Images  

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    Joe finishes off with one more example where instead of playing the A7 notes over the D7 for the last 4 bars he arpeggiates on the 7th fret A form of E7 then slides up to arpeggiate the 10th fret E form of D7 then down to the 5th fret A7. I am so used to playing where my fretboard movement in these 4 bars goes from the E7 down to D7....not used to going E7 up to D7 it's a nice change to remember.

    E7 up D7 down A7 walk up to E
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:16 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    I wanted to hit a bit more on James Burton before then next lesson.


    http://www.james-burton.net/portal/index.php

    His web site has a very detailed bio, album credits for over 350 albums and a several of his solos tabbed out if you are interested.



    James Burton

    Although not very well known by the general public, James Burton is acknowledged by many in the industry as one of the best and most influential guitarists of the rock era. He has worked with many of the great names in the history of music in the latter half of the Twentieth Century.

    He was born in Minden, Louisiana in 1939, and moved to Shreveport, Louisiana with his family at age ten. James Burton learned to play the guitar and to love music at an early age. Like many other musicians who came from the South, he found his way to the Louisiana Hayride radio program in the 50's. There he served as a backup musician for some of the bigger names on the bill, such as George Jones, Slim Whitman, and others. He made contact with another Louisiana born musician named Dale Hawkins, and Burton's guitar solo on Hawkins' 1957 hit Suzie Q made people begin to notice that this was a teenager with a lot of talent.

    James Burton went on to work as a backup musician with Bob Luman for a while, then headed for the West Coast and began a long, successful collaboration with Ricky Nelson. Burton played guitar in a picking style similar to guitarists who recorded on the Sun label, such as Scotty Moore and Carl Perkins. One example of this style is very much in evidence on Nelson's top ten hit from 1958 Believe What You Say. Partly as a result of his work with Burton, Ricky Nelson went on to a smoother country rock style of music. Burton can be seen in the background, playing guitar, on some of the musical interludes on the old Ozzie & Harriet television shows on which Nelson starred with his parents.

    By the mid-60's James Burton had established himself and was highly regarded in the music industry. He left Ricky Nelson's band and was recruited to help start a band to work with Elvis Presley, when Presley returned to performing live in 1969. Burton worked with Presley until the latter's death in 1977, and continued to do session work. He was in demand, and worked with many big names in rock and country circles, including artists such as Randy Newman, Buffalo Springfield, Hoyt Axton, Judy Collins, and many others.

    In the 1970's he worked with Gram Parsons, one of the prime movers in the emerging country rock style of music. Burton played on Parsons' albums GP and Grievous Angel. After Parsons' death in 1973, Burton went with the Hot Band formed by Parsons' girlfriend, Emmylou Harris. His work came to be appreciated by a new generation of fans. His first loyalty during this time was to Presley's ensemble, but he toured with Harris when time allowed. Burton came to be known for some outstanding guitar solos.

    He had established a pattern of remaining loyal over several years to artists with whom he enjoyed working, and began to play this time with John Denver. He played a variety of different types of guitars, most notably, the Fender Telecaster. He never had a top forty hit of his own and recorded only two albums under his own name, Corn Pickin' and Slick Slidin' in the 60's and The Guitar Sounds of James Burton in the early 70's.

    James Burton has had a long and varied career, working with many of the great names in the music business. He has worked hard and established himself among the best guitarists, while remaining out of the limelight. He is acknowledged by many as a major influence on the evolution of country rock.
    http://www.tsimon.com/burton.htm


    In 1969, Burton became guitarist in Elvis Presley’s “TCB” band, a spot he kept until Presley’s death in 1977. He continued to do session work during this period, and also worked extensively with Emmylou Harris. Post-Presley, Burton began a 15-year stint with John Denver, and worked with Jerry Lee Lewis, Kenny Rogers and Cash. Burton teamed up with Elvis Costello in 1986, a collaboration that would last for four albums.

    Burton appeared in the 1998 television special Roy Orbison and Friends: A Black and White Night, backing up the legendary singer along with guests including Costello, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Waits, Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and others.

    He remained as busy as ever. Burton was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001 by Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards. In 2005, he held the first of his annual James Burton International Guitar Festival events in Shreveport, benefiting his own charitable foundation.
    http://www.fender.com/artists/artist.php?id=8
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:17 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  43. #93
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    James Burton's Guitar

    James Burton Standard Telecaster

    The Standard model of the James Burton Telecaster was introduced in 1996 and features a solid alder body finished in Candy Apple Red with a 1-ply white pickguard. This model was inspired by Burton's third guitar, the 1953 Telecaster that he played on the seminal 1957 recording of "Susie Q" with Dale Hawkins.[1] The neck is a 1-piece maple 1960's vintage U-shape design with a satin finish and 1950's-style decals. The hardware includes a vintage six-saddle Telecaster bridge, a pair of Texas Special Tele single-coil pickups, a three-way switch and vintage chrome Ping tuners. This instrument is made in Mexico.[2]
    [edit] James Burton Telecaster Upgrade
    James Burton - Live in Concert with his Upgrade model Telecaster

    The Upgrade model features a solid basswood body finished in solid Olympic Pearl, or with a flame design in Red Paisley or Blue Paisley on a black background. This model is based on a 1969 Paisley Red model Telecaster (popularly called Pink Paisley) that Burton played while touring with Elvis Presley from 1969 to 1977.[3] The neck is the same as the Standard model. The electronics include three specially designed James Burton blade single-coil pickups (mounted similar to the Stratocaster layout) and a 5-way "Strat-o-Tele" pickup selector with an S-1 switching system that allows a wide variety of pickup tones. The hardware includes a gold-plated hard-tail Strat bridge, gold-plated Schaller die-cast tuners with black or pearl buttons and gold-plated tone and volume knobs.[4] The current Upgrade model was designed to commemorate a 2005 benefit concert for the James Burton Foundation in Shreveport, Louisiana.[1] This model is made in America
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Burton_Telecaster


    Only $939.99



    only $2019.99

    Type: Telecaster®
    Model Name: James Burton Telecaster®
    Model Number: 010-8602-(Color #)
    Series: Artist Series
    Colors: (823) Olympic Pearl,
    (887) Red Paisley Flames,
    (888) Blue Paisley Flames,
    (Urethane Finish)
    Body: Basswood
    Neck: 1-Piece Maple, ‘60’s “U” Shape,
    (Satin Urethane Finish)
    Fingerboard: Maple, 9.5” Radius (241 mm)
    No. of Frets: 21 Vintage Frets
    Pickups: 1 James Burton Neck Blade Pickup,
    1 James Burton Mid Blade Pickup,
    1 James Burton Bridge Blade Pickup
    Controls: Master Volume, Master Tone
    Pickup Switching: 5-Position Blade, Special "Strat-o-Tele" with S-1 Switching:
    Position 1. Bridge Pickup
    Position 2. Bridge and Middle Pickup in Parallel (Series w/ S-1™ DOWN)
    Position 3. Bridge and Neck Pickup in Parallel (Middle Pickup Only w/ S-1™ DOWN)
    Position 4. Middle and Neck Pickup in Parallel (Series w/ S-1™ DOWN)
    Position 5. Neck Pickup
    Bridge: American Vintage Strat Strings-Through-Body Hardtail Bridge
    Machine Heads: Gold-Plated Fender® Deluxe Cast/Sealed Tuning Machines with Pearl Buttons
    Hardware: Gold-Plated
    Pickguard: None
    Scale Length: 25.5” (648 mm)
    Width at Nut: 1.650” (42 mm)
    Unique Features: Special '60's “U” Shape Neck,
    Special Design James Burton Pickups,
    Paisley Flame Finish on (887) and (888),
    Strat-o-Tele Switching with S-1™ Switch
    Strings: Fender Super 250L, Nickel Plated Steel,
    Gauges: (.009, .011, .016, .024, .032, .042),
    p/n 073-0250-003
    Accessories: Vintage Tweed Case, Strap, Cable
    Case: Vintage Tweed Hardshell Case, P/N 0023637000
    Introduced: 1/2006



    The Pink Paisley Telecaster

    James is probably most well known for playing this guitar. In 1969, James got a call from Fender, telling him they had a guitar that was screaming his name. When he was performing with Elvis, James was a little hesitant to play the Pink Paisley on stage, because he thought that it looked too bright. But Elvis' "guys" were pushing him to play the guitar on stage so he did and Elvis loved it.


    Emmylou Harris would sometimes play one of James' Telecasters.
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:17 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  44. #94
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    Let's Rock R1

    Again we are at another foundation area of Rock and Roll. This lesson is characterized by the "straight eight" feel and the shuffle rhythm is no where to be found.

    Joe mentions 3 artists in this lesson all of which are noteworthy: Scotty Moore, Carl Perkins and Billy Butler. So here's some history:

    Billy Butler

    Billy Butler (guitarist)
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to: navigation, search

    Billy Butler (15 December 1925–20 March 1991) was an American soul jazz guitarist born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

    He played with The Harlemaires, Houston Person, Harry "Doc" Bagby, Jimmy Smith, David "Fathead" Newman, Bill Doggett, King Curtis and others.[1]

    He also co-wrote, with Bill Doggett, the 1956 R&B hit "Honky Tonk".
    [edit] Discography

    * Guitar Soul! (1969)
    * This Is Billy Butler (1969)
    * Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1970)
    * Listen Now! (1970)
    * Billy Butler Plays Via Galactica (1973)
    * Guitar Odyssey (1974)
    * Don't Be That Way (1976)
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_B...28guitarist%29




    A tasty soul-jazz and blues guitarist, Billy Butler adroitly mixed a Charlie Christian approach with '50s R&B grooves and backbeats. He coaxed a warm, fat tone from his hollow-bodied electric guitar, and provided deceptively simple solos and fills that became staples of the R&B guitar vocabularly. Bill Doggett's "Honky Tonk," featuring Butler, is perhaps the prototype R&B guitar instrumental. "Ram-Bunk'-Shush" and "Big Boy" are other highlights of his tenure with Doggett. He began playing with the doo-wop/R&B group the Harlemaires in the late '40s, then led combos until 1952, when he joined Doc Bagby's trio. Butler co-wrote "Honky Tonk" while playing with Doggett from 1954 to 1961. He also recorded with King Curtis, Dinah Washington, Panama Francis, Johnny Hodges, Jimmy Smith and David "Fathead" Newman in the '60s. Butler worked in Broadway pit bands beginning in the late '60s, but found time for recording sessions with Houston Person and Norris Turney in the late '60s and '70s. He led his own band and recorded for Prestige in the late '60s and early '70s. Butler also recorded with Al Casey and Jackie Williams. He toured Europe frequently in the '70s and '80s, doing sessions there and in America. ~ Ron Wynn and Richard Lieberson, All Music Guide

    http://www.amazon.com/Billy-Butler/e...ntt_mus_dp_pel



    Sublimely tasteful guitarist Billy Butler and the Bill Doggett Combo's classic '56 R&B instrumental "Honky Tonk" will be forever linked. Players as diverse as jazz avant-gardist James Blood Ulmer and Creedence Clearwater Revival's John Fogerty have acknowledged copping Billy's 36-measure monument to cool logic and smoldering soul. But Butler's influence extends beyond golden oldies, as nouveau swing guitarists like Duke Robillard, Little Charlie Baty and Junior Watson can attest.

    Honky-Tonk pt.1
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRJEL...eature=related

    Honky-Tonk pt. 2
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MxFiS...eature=related

    A little clip of Ruth Brown with Billy Butler taking a lead break.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cScN3cCHUM0
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 05-03-2010 at 11:59 AM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

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    Carl Perkins








    WATCH THIS! Carl, Scotty, Buddy Holly, Johnny Cash and Elvis at a High School gig. Very short but legendary film:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mr497...eature=related

    With his smash 1956 hit classic "Blue Suede Shoes," Carl Perkins virtually defined and established rockabilly music in the rock and roll cannon and launched Sun Records into national prominence. Carl Perkins is regarded by many as one of the founding fathers of rock-and-roll. Although he placed only one record in the pop top forty "Blue Suede Shoes," it became a legendary one in the annals of rock-and-roll and propelled Perkins, one of the original rockabilly singers, into his legendary status.
    Born Carl Lee Perkins near Tiptonville, Tennessee in 1932, the son of the only white sharecropper (Fonie "Buck" Perkings)on a cotton plantation and Louise Brantley. The family lived first in a three room shack and then a one room storehouse. The family was so poor that kids in the neighborhood brought cast off clothes for the Perkins brothers.
    Growing up in Tennessee with his brothers, Jay B. and Clayton, Carl learned to play the guitar and became quite proficient at it. He listened to country music, gospel, and blues, and began to write some of his own compositions. At 13 he performed a song that he had written, Movie Magg, at a local talent show and won. He formed a group with Jay and Clayton called the Perkins Brothers. Carl played electric guitar and did most of the singing with Jay playing acoustic rhythm guitar, and Clayton the upright bass.

    Shortly after World War II the family moved to Bemis Tennessee, where the brothers worked in the cotton mills. Buck was unable to get a job in the mills because of a lung condition, and Perkins family went back to sharecropping.
    In 1950 the family moved to Jackson, Tennessee where he formed a group with Jay and Clayton called the Perkins Brothers which began to perform at a local honky tonk known as the El Rancho Club in 1947 and 1948. W. B. Holland joined the group as a drummer. They appeared on WDXT radio in his home town of Jackson, Tennessee from 1950 to 1952. Meanwhile, Carl spent many years working during the day at Colonial Baking Company in Jackson as a baker.

    On January 24, 1953, Perkins married Valda Crider from Cornith, Mississippi. They moved to the government housing project in Jackson and began having children.
    arl signed a recording contract with Flip Records, a subsidiary of Sun in Memphis, on January 25, 1955. His first release was Movie Magg, written when he was fourteen, that sold slowly. However, it allowed him to get bookings where he opened for Elvis. Phillips felt that he could make a rockabilly star out of Perkins with the right song. According to Perkins, after a show in Parkin, Arkansas when he was touring with Elvis Presley and Johnny Cash, he wrote down the words of someone on the dance floor warning his date to stay away from his new blue suede shoes. "Blue Suede Shoes" was recorded December, 1955, and released January 1, 1956 on the Sun label.

    At first "Blue Suede Shoes" sold slowly. Early in 1956 Perkins began making regular appearances on "Big D Jamboree" on radio station in Dallas where he played the song every Saturday night. Slowly it began to catch on - first in the country market, then with teenagers and finally with rhythm and blues fans.

    :Blue Suede Shoes" song put 23-year old Carl Perkins in the national spotlight. Appearances were arranged for the Ed Sullivan and Perry Como TV shows, but while traveling to New York for those engagements he was involved in a terrible automobile accident. The driver, Dave Stewart fell asleep at the wheel and the car ran into a pick-up truck near Dover, Delaware. Stewart was killed, Carl suffered a fractured skull and broken arm. His brother Jay's neck was broken from which he would never recover. Eventually Elvis Presley, covered Blue Suede Shoes, which became Elvis' third top forty hit. These events served to steal some of the his thunder and Perkins never quite recovered his momentum in the world of pop, although his place in music history was assured.

    Perkins wrote his songs and always stayed with the pure rockabilly style.Carl continued to record songs that were country hits, such as " Dixie Fried," " Boppin' The Blues," and "Your True Love," the latter two of which became minor pop hits. The flip side of Blue Suede Shoes was "Honey Don't," which had originally been intended as the A-side. "Honey Don't" was discovered by the Beatles who covered it along with two more of Carl's songs, "Everybody's Trying To Be My Baby" and "Matchbox". Latter day pop artists who would acknowledge the influence of Carl Perkins include Rick Nelson, John Fogerty, Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, and Paul McCartney, who said "If there were no Perkins, there would be no Beatles."

    Following the death of his brother Jay in 1958, Carl signed a 5 year deal at 6% with Columbia. Songs by country influenced singers such as Buddy Knox and the Everly Brothers were crossing over to the pop charts. Carl had some more minor pop hits with records such as Pink Pedal Pushers and Pointed Toe Shoes, but he eventually went back to country music. He signed with the Dollie label in 1963 and joined his friend Johnny Cash's road show in January1965. After Cash's guitarist Luther Perkins (no relation) died accidentally in 1968 Perkins became a member of the Tennessee Two. His composition "Daddy Sang Bass" was a big hit for Cash. He was to stay with Cash for ten years, exhibiting his fine guitar-playing, performing solo at times, and occasionally writing songs. Carl continued recording country songs into the 70's. His brother Clayton passed away in 1974.
    In the mid-70's he appeared at the Wembley Festival in England and advertised his new album, Old Blue Suede Shoes Is Back Again, on British television. He has continued to record songs for various labels, including his own, the appropriately named Suede. He works with a five-man band that includes his sons Stan and Gregg. He has also collaborated with other notable artists over the years, including his work on the album The Million Dollar Quartet with Cash, Presley, and Jerry Lee Lewis and on The Trio Plus with Lewis, Charley Pride, and others.

    Carl Perkins appeared in the 1985 film Into The Night and won the Grammy Hall of Fame Award in 1986 for Blue Suede Shoes.

    Carl Perkins passed away January 19th, 1998.
    http://www.history-of-rock.com/perkins.htm

    Carl Perkins and Blue Suede Shoes:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=if35CAgL1go

    Carl Perkins That' Alright Mama
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=McaemUBvGaA
    Last edited by Wolfboy1; 05-03-2010 at 11:56 AM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  46. #96
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    Scotty Moore


    Elvis Presley - Heartbreak Hotel

    "Heartbreak Hotel" is a rock and roll song performed by Elvis Presley, with Bill Black, Scotty Moore, D.J. Fontana, Floyd Cramer and Elvis on rhythm guitar as the main supporting musicians. Recorded in January 1956 in Nashville, the song introduced Presley to the American national music consciousness. It was released as a single with the b-side song "I Was The One" on January 27, 1956. "Heartbreak Hotel" became the first No.1 pop record by Elvis and was the best selling single of 1956.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MKd5P4tOj0I

    A great interview of Scotty:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36z-uOgJlko

    Scotty on Elvis and "The 68 Comeback Special" and other stories
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n34NH...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQ_Bg...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCHSv...eature=related

    Scotty Moore and Carl Perkins:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3g9RC...eature=related


    Scotty and Eric Clapton
    That's Alright Mama
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yljBG...eature=related
    Mystery Train
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nz0b...eature=related








    We often think of the solidbody electric guitar as the instrument that gave birth to rock and roll, citing guitars like the Fender Broadcaster of 1950, the Gibson Les Paul of 1952, or the Fender Stratocaster and the Gretsch Duo Jet (actually a semi-solid design) of 1954. The fact is, however, when these new tools were just hitting the scene—and while the whole concept of a solidbodied guitar was still awaiting judgment from players at large—rock and roll was already being forged on the instruments that great players had been using to make groundbreaking music for a full decade or more. Chuck Berry, Danny Cedrone with Bill Haley and His Comets, Cliff Gallup with Gene Vincent and His Blue Caps, Eddie Cochran, and Duane Eddy all helped to establish this now-familiar sound on archtop acoustic-electric guitars. But arguably none was as influential, by dint of sheer mass-market exposure alone, as Scotty Moore with Elvis Presley. Playing a range of Gibson archtops in a setting that was not really so far removed from the jazz orchestra’s bandstand, Moore laid down a driving, frenetic new style of guitar playing that was utterly revolutionary for its time, and which forever changed the face of popular music. It was a winding road to rock and roll, but the music’s main proponents took its dips and hairpin turns at breakneck speed from the late 1930s until the mid ’50s, when the new genre was commonly recognized. The swift confluence of sounds that gave birth to the music of the time is thoroughly documented. Less often discussed, however, is the fact that the wilder, out-of-left-field rhythmic riffing styles developing in near-equal measures in country, blues, and jazz were all being played on very similar equipment—simply because that’s all that any guitarist had available to them at the time—and it’s fascinating to consider the rapid evolution of both playing styles and rigs in the short space of the preceding decade. By and large, these artists were all playing archtop guitars manufactured by Gibson, Epiphone, Gretsch, or—eventually—Guild, through amps that were very often sold by the same maker or, by the mid 1940s, one of the Fender amps originally intended for that new company’s lap-steel guitars. All of these guitars were big, somewhat dark and boomy sounding by today’s standards, and not over-blessed with sustain or definition; the amps, meanwhile, were basic and low-volume creations by today’s standards. Nevertheless, turn an adventurous jazz, blues, or western-swing artist loose on a rig like this, and he was going to give you something wild, make no mistake.

    Although he died 10 years before the music was given a name, Charlie Christian’s scorching, infectious single-note riffing clearly prefigured rock and roll guitar styles. Likewise, the playing of jazzer Eddie Durham, jazz-inflected blues man T-Bone Walker, and country guitarists Junior Barnard of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys and Bob McNett with Hank Williams and the Drifting Cowboys shows adventurous musicians cutting loose with radical bends, rapid single-note runs, and gutsy double-stop lines that would all have felt entirely at home in early rock and roll … if the music had been invented.

    What the burgeoning new genre really needed to make it a movement, though, was a frontman, a heartthrob of a star, and not just a collection of revolutionary sidemen. That star lit the night of the 1950s music scene in the biggest way possible in the form of Elvis Presley, of course, but even Elvis owed a lot to the men making the music behind him, and none carried as much of the weight of the instrumental side of the early Elvis experience as Scotty Moore.

    You’ve heard them all before. That sound is in your blood and doesn’t really require any further transfusion. But just for kicks, and with your tonehound’s hat on, check out Elvis’s “That’s All Right (Mama),” “Heartbreak Hotel,” “Mystery Train,” and “Hound Dog,” and dig how lively, vibrant, and dynamic that guitar playing really is. Moore’s lithe, nimble style drives the music no doubt, but his tone kicks the whole Elvis experience up a notch with a fervor equal to his chops.

    Scotty Moore with a Gibson L-5Early on with Elvis, Moore played a Gibson ES-295, then briefly an L-5, but is most famously seen with a Super 400CES (the suffix denoting “Cutaway Electric Spanish”). Having already said that these archtop electrics were predisposed to being “dark and boomy,” Moore does get a lot of bite and sizzle out of his early ’50s Gibson Super 400CES. This was a pre-humbucker guitar, so it carried two cutting, aggressive P-90 pickups, singlecoil units that really do embody the gritty, muscular tone of vintage rock and roll. Of course Moore’s amplifier played a big part in the sound, too, and his was a rare and unusual concoction, to say the least. Nowhere else do you find such a seminal example of the slap-back echo sound that partially defines early rock and roll guitar as in the playing of Scotty Moore … other than, perhaps, that of Carl Perkins or mid-’50s Chet Atkins. What do they all have in common? The Ray Butts EchoSonic amp, of course.

    In the early ’50s Butts developed a loop-based echo system that first used a loop of recording wire, then tape when it became available, which was small enough to be mounted in the back of a guitar amplifier. The design, which he called the EchoSonic, became an instant hit with some Memphis and Nashville guitarists, and although he only ever made a limited number of EchoSonics himself, Butts’s concept for the tape echo would be emulated by a number of other popular products. An external tape echo unit called the Echoplex was built first by Market Electronics in Cleveland, Ohio, in the late ’50s, then by Harris-Teller of Chicago, Illinois. The latter was marketed by Gibson’s sibling company, Maestro, and is the best-known version of the early tube-powered EchoPlex. Today Gibson offers an extremely versatile digital emulation of the legendary EchoPlex, the Echoplex Digital Pro Plus, while actual tape-loop echo units are quite rare. The effects maker Fulltone introduced a highly regarded unit a couple years ago, the Tube Tape Echo (TTE), based roughly on an updated, modified tube Echoplex, and Hiwatt has introduced a rack-mountable solid-state tap echo. Alternatively, dial up a good, short echo on your favorite analog delay pedal, plug in an archtop electric with fat sounding P-90 pickups, and inject it all through a vintage-style tube amp, and you won’t be a million miles from the Scotty Moore sound. Bang out that slap and tickle, and you’re ready to rock and roll all night. Be warned: it gets in your blood.
    http://images.google.com/imgres?imgu...26tbs%3Disch:1

    Jailhouse Rock Powertab
    http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/..._power_tab.htm

    Heartbreak Hotel Powertab
    http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/..._power_tab.htm

    That's Alright Mama tab
    http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/...t_mama_tab.htm
    Last edited by rjbasque; 10-10-2013 at 08:18 PM.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  47. #97
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    [waving hand raised in back of classroom]
    Umm Professor Wolfboy, I thought this was MUSIC class?!

    This course does lend itself to a history class doesn't it. You've done a great job digging up the background material. The problem I have is I'm spending all the time I should be practicing, reading all the history and watching youtube videos!

    I unfortunately had an Epiphany and have been somewhat detoured. But I'll try and through a comment in once in a while.
    Honey, I'm spending money on guitars or women, ... your choice.

    If you take Satan for a ride, pretty soon he'll want to drive.


    Favorite Course - Blues Alchemy
    Working On - Fretboard Epiphanies & Jump Blues

  48. #98
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    So on with "Lets Rock" R-1.

    Listening to this lesson I just wanted to kick off my shoes and go sock-hoppin. It really has that early rock/Happy Days vibe going for me.Joe is playing Straight 8th notes (see 2:05 in the lesson)while deriving riffs from 7th chords.

    A7: A C# E G (1-3-5-7)
    E7: E G# B D (1-3-5-7)

    then a B and A chord run

    B: B D# F# G# F# (1-3-5-6-5)
    A: A C# E F# E (1-3-5-6-5)

    He also uses the 6th as a passing note in the 7th chords.
    A7: 6th = F#
    E7: 6th = C#

    Pretty straight forward rhythm (pun intended). Start your metronome a bit slower at first if needed and your off!

    P.S. notice the "pinch harmonic" at the end. If you are struggling to do pinch harmonics get a V-pick....it's a lot easier.

    http://www.v-picks.com/picks

    and a cool video from Vinnie
    http://www.v-picks.com/videos/89

    2 Pinch Harminic lessons..."Squealies"
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5I5O8P-r5Rk

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etjNPSAbHMg
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  49. #99
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
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    Hey RJ, I think you will find this course is an early intermediate level (but definitely not a beginner course). Nothing too difficult yet but what makes it interesting is the history behind so much of what Joe is building upon.(well at least for me). Joe covers his lessons well so I don't have much to add to his fundamentals. So pick and choose what you have time for.... or at least enjoy the pretty pictures. I try to post the ones I find interesting.
    Too soon we grow old, too late we grow wise

    "I once played notes so fast that light emanated from the strings whereupon, I saw God.... who then told me to relax and start playing music."

    "You know, once you've had that guitar up so loud on the stage, where you can lean back and volume will stop you from falling backward, that's a hard drug to kick." David Gilmour

    Truefire Science Officer (dabgonit....where's my blue shirt!)

  50. #100
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,056
    Blog Entries
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    Default

    WB gotta thank you again for all the work you've put into the Blog truly awesome and really enjoying the artists vids...especially Billy Butler, I'm a big fan of early sixties soul/rnb Impressions etc ...never mind Scotty Moore and Carl Perkins et al I've just made my wife's day by sending her a link from a 190 Elvis Gospel tunes playlist from the Heartbreak Hotel link, cool



    H
    Worked On: BGSG Course BlogWorking On: 50 R&B Bass Grooves YMK Blog

    Groove long and prosper Tune in to Funk Friday

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