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Hutch82
05-29-2010, 02:20 PM
Have been adjusting to nylon the last few days since aquiring the Yamaha this week and it's already throwing up some technique issues. Barreing and stretching maintaining string pressure are giving the most problem. Found Kevin R. Gallagher's channel with some helpful technique to work on

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzYfdYtoFf4&feature=channel

good educator too, have Pumping Nylon on order that herby recommended, TAB version. Anybody else what to chip in with their own adventures in nylon world Brad might pick up.

working on Shape of my Heart and Girl from Ipanema and have a list of bossa toons in the in tray, what you working on?

H

Hutch82
06-01-2010, 11:11 AM
Certainly discovering some new areas to work on....watched an hour of Scott Tennant's Pumping Nylon and rest/free strokes, placing finger tip on a string before playing, string pressure excercises are giving me lots of ch-ching a-ha tone moments...

these Guiliano right hand studies are also new to me here's a few tab examples I found to practice

http://www.tulsaguitar.org/rhs1.pdf

and this young dude demostrating them, giving it techzilla

http://youtube.com/watch?v=PeQHLuq6TDE&feature=related

feeling that these new techniques are boosting my overall trick bag already...mmm

H

herby
06-01-2010, 11:44 AM
Congrats on the breakthroughs Hutch. You can't practice these RH exercises enough. The guy in the video plays them very nicely. I'd only suggest that you try and keep your RH little finger more relaxed then he does even though you're not using it. His little finger is sticking out and RH little fingers don't stick out naturally. It's a sign of tension in the hand that may come back to haunt him as he speeds them up.

Ideally, the RH hand should be just as relaxed when you are playing as it is when it hangs to your side when you're standing and not even thinking about it. Let gravity do it's thing (when standing) and your RH will fall naturally into a soft curve of the fingers and a straight thumb. THAT is the playing position--as close to the natural shape of the hand as possible. From there just play them (the Giuliani studies for instance) slowly and in time and feel the ease of it all. RH fingers fire like a piston. BOOM through the string and then immediately back into the natural relaxed state. Hope this (makes sense, and) helps.

Wolfboy1
06-01-2010, 12:37 PM
I think there is a LOT I don't know about when it comes to playing nylon. It really is a different technique all together. When Truefire gets onboard I will jump on it:rasta:

Nice posts Hutch and Herby.

Hutch82
06-02-2010, 02:59 AM
herby thanks for the tips and the encouragement. It's very quickly clear with nylon the physical production of a good tone is more of challenge after stepping off a slick playing electric but oh so rewarding when you get it right...I've had the action set up but don't know if I could go a tad lower, any thoughts on action herb, maybe do some research later.
WB seem to remember Brad Carlton has a classical pedigree maybe he could be a good choice to do a "Get into Nylon" course, not necessarily classical biased look at Rodrigo Y Gabriela par example for a broad appeal

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNc5o9TU0t0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUYQMslOobw&feature=fvw

H

herby
06-02-2010, 10:05 AM
herby thanks for the tips and the encouragement. It's very quickly clear with nylon the physical production of a good tone is more of challenge after stepping off a slick playing electric but oh so rewarding when you get it right...I've had the action set up but don't know if I could go a tad lower, any thoughts on action herb, maybe do some research later.
WB seem to remember Brad Carlton has a classical pedigree maybe he could be a good choice to do a "Get into Nylon" course, not necessarily classical biased look at Rodrigo Y Gabriela par example for a broad appeal H

I'm afraid I'm not one that can give you advice on the setup for a classical. There are folks a lot more qualified. I guess I'd suffice it to say that nylons just don't finger as well as what you might be used to, but your LH will strengthen on its own with practice and the feel of the action will become second nature.

As for getting good tone, I tell people not to worry about tone so much at first and never worry about speed. Teach yourself to play with a very (very) soft, light touch with the RH and allow your fingers to learn the "muscle memory" of the movements. (I tell kids to think of it as "whispering" with the guitar.) As your muscle memory improves your fingers will naturally find it easier to make the movements, making tone and speed a by-product of this kind of practice. Like practically every teacher on TF TV says, and as counter-intuitive as it may seem, the slower you practice the quicker you will pick it up. Fight that little devil on your shoulder (the ego?) that tells you to play faster. In short, practice so slowly that you can't possibly make a mistake... and this can seem REALLY slow sometimes. The good news is that it works every time.

Hutch82
06-02-2010, 01:48 PM
I'm afraid I'm not one that can give you advice on the setup for a classical. There are folks a lot more qualified. I guess I'd suffice it to say that nylons just don't finger as well as what you might be used to, but your LH will strengthen on its own with practice and the feel of the action will become second nature.

As for getting good tone, I tell people not to worry about tone so much at first and never worry about speed. Teach yourself to play with a very (very) soft, light touch with the RH and allow your fingers to learn the "muscle memory" of the movements. (I tell kids to think of it as "whispering" with the guitar.) As your muscle memory improves your fingers will naturally find it easier to make the movements, making tone and speed a by-product of this kind of practice. Like practically every teacher on TF TV says, and as counter-intuitive as it may seem, the slower you practice the quicker you will pick it up. Fight that little devil on your shoulder (the ego?) that tells you to play faster. In short, practice so slowly that you can't possibly make a mistake... and this can seem REALLY slow sometimes. The good news is that it works every time.Hey "Nylon Whisperer" thank you BIG for sharing...I normally play very light and I was having this thing that I needed to muscle these pieces of spaghetti but I'm going to take on board the light and slow mantra for a while, I'm in no rush I'm back into playing and that for me is a good thing it's always been an old friend and they say you have to work at friendships...I think being a baby nylon player I'm going to leave the action as is after it's set up and live in to it, build up some base technique.

herb you've inspired today my friend...high 5


H

herby
06-03-2010, 10:15 AM
Hey "Nylon Whisperer" thank you BIG for sharing...I normally play very light and I was having this thing that I needed to muscle these pieces of spaghetti but I'm going to take on board the light and slow mantra for a while, I'm in no rush I'm back into playing and that for me is a good thing it's always been an old friend and they say you have to work at friendships...I think being a baby nylon player I'm going to leave the action as is after it's set up and live in to it, build up some base technique.

herb you've inspired today my friend...high 5


H

I got a kick out of your "nylon whisperer" comment Hutch lol. Thank you very much for the kind words. I really like what you said about having to "work at friendships". That statement alone tells me that you get it, and I'll be stealing that line (thank you very much). I tell people too that it's a long drive to California (I live on the east coast), but there are a lot of really nice things to see between here and there. The trick is to keep yourself from repeating "are we there yet?", and enjoy the journey. Don't forget that learning even just the first of the Giuliani studies, and playing with a real since of ease is a HUGE accomplishment that deserves a well-earned pat on the back. Beyond that, make friends with the metronome if you haven't already and remember that these things should swing eventually just as sure as an Earth, Wind and Fire tune. Feel free to keep me up to date with how it's going or ask anything. Thanks again... and high 5 back at'cha...Herb

Hutch82
06-06-2010, 01:39 PM
Been doing a bit of reading in the Frederick Noad book Solo Guitar Playing that I bourght in the 80's and wondering if I want to pursue reading music again. [What's that Whisper on my right shoulder LOL] I must admit at the time I bourght the book I just couldn't grasp it but doesn't seem as daunting now. Reading and watching about building some nylon technique has side tracked me a little I thought all I wanted to do was busk some bossa tunes like in this bad but brilliant way

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MrJZ5LkKE5Y&feature=channel

but there's some funky classical tunes that I'd love to master even the "easy ones" seem like "bloody hell" at the moment

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L0PlECAp_cE

I've made a start on the Guiliani R/H studies amazingly challenging...the wife say's they sound "nicer" than the usual Paul Gilbert R/H studies LOL

H

herby
06-07-2010, 09:35 AM
You can teach yourself to read starting with the Noad book Hutch. Go for it. The difficulty of reading music is highly overrated.

Fernando Sor wrote some great simple studies for guitar that will help a lot too. I highly recommend them. There are the famous "20 Studies for Guitar" but they are actually pretty advanced. Look for some of the earlier ones, especially the ones in the keys of C and G.

I thought the guy did a great explanation of the rest stroke in the Lagrima video. Note his arched RH. Pulling the wrist in towards the soundboard creates tension... again, your worst enemy.

The Brazilian bossa nova players use pretty much the same techniques. Thanks for posting the vids. Have fun.

Hutch82
06-07-2010, 11:52 AM
You can teach yourself to read starting with the Noad book Hutch. Go for it. The difficulty of reading music is highly overrated.
herb thanks again for the great advice and I'm hearing what your saying about the reading...the Noad book does spell it out well. It's going to help read rhythms as well...anyway I'll trickle feed it in to the schedule and see where it goes.

light n slow, light n slow...sorry just verbalising my mantra

Thumbs up herb

H

herby
06-08-2010, 10:15 AM
light n slow, light n slow...sorry just verbalising my mantra

Thumbs up herb

H



Good mantra... I have no doubt you're on the way... Congrats : )

Hutch82
06-08-2010, 11:05 AM
Hey herb...this may seem a strange question but do you have any regime for learning to read[music] what do you do with your students? LOL If you lived round the corner I'd be round with a nice Bordeaux for a chin wag...you can start billing me if you like :)

H

herby
06-08-2010, 11:38 AM
Hey herb...this may seem a strange question but do you have any regime for learning to read[music] what do you do with your students? LOL If you lived round the corner I'd be round with a nice Bordeaux for a chin wag...you can start billing me if you like :)

H
A nice Bordeaux would certainly get my chin to wagging about guitar lol. Sounds like a lot of fun. I wish we could do it Hutch.

Any of the decent beginners books will teach you to start to read one string at a time in first position. I use Hal Leonard books to teach kids. Alfred books are good too and I'm sure there are others. The tunes are going to seem really dorky at first but press on and you will learn to read quickly and then get on to the good stuff. Spend just a few minutes a day and you'll get it in no time. The Noad book is a good start for classical guitar and there are others for that too. It's a just do it kind of thing.

There's few things I'd like to do more then teach guitar online lol, but I'm afraid I'm not computer savvy enough.
: /

slasner
06-09-2010, 12:50 PM
Today I uploaded an audio podcast lesson that I think is awesome! It's title is Brutal but fruitful practice routine from TrueFire's acoustic U and Benjmin Veredy. It can be found on Itunes as well as in TrueFire's audio lessons library
http://truefire.com/list.html?store=audio_lessons&section=acoustic&orderby=title&offset=20&item=1085

Hutch82
06-09-2010, 01:28 PM
Today I uploaded an audio podcast lesson that I think is awesome! It's title is Brutal but fruitful practice routine from TrueFire's acoustic U and Benjmin Veredy. It can be found on Itunes as well as in TrueFire's audio lessons library
http://truefire.com/list.html?store=audio_lessons&section=acoustic&orderby=title&offset=20&item=1085

Nylon's good in here Red thanks for putting Benjamin Verdy up will investigate...:clapping:

slasner
06-09-2010, 03:12 PM
yea I posted here because it was on a nylon string guitar and I felt it pertained to the thread. Enjoy!!

Hutch82
06-15-2010, 04:19 PM
Gettting into the Guiliani R/H techniques little bit everyday now to build up the R/H L/H coordination. I don't what it is but maybe the nylon string guage and the string spacing still are giving me fingering "issues" s'pose it's just keep doin' it. Finding the tone sweet spot above the soundhole, at least pleasing to my cloth ears...very hooked into nylon

H

herby
06-16-2010, 10:03 AM
Gettting into the Guiliani R/H techniques little bit everyday now to build up the R/H L/H coordination. I don't what it is but maybe the nylon string guage and the string spacing still are giving me fingering "issues" s'pose it's just keep doin' it. Finding the tone sweet spot above the soundhole, at least pleasing to my cloth ears...very hooked into nylon

H
I often think that a great part of learning guitar is a mind game. Just the belief that you're getting a little better with these studies every time you do them seems to help a great deal and tend to help with focus and ease of movement. This of course applies to anything you practice, but requires honesty with one's self. Difficulties with the gauge of the strings and the wider neck are small problems that will take care of themselves with a positive outlook... "I think I can... I think I can". Those moments when it all comes together and "clicks" makes it all worth while. And the more often you do it, slowly and with a sense of deliberateness on each note, in time, the more often it "clicks". Sounds like to me your on the right track Hutch. Keep it up. : )

herby
06-16-2010, 11:19 AM
Today I uploaded an audio podcast lesson that I think is awesome! It's title is Brutal but fruitful practice routine from TrueFire's acoustic U and Benjmin Veredy. It can be found on Itunes as well as in TrueFire's audio lessons library
http://truefire.com/list.html?store=audio_lessons&section=acoustic&orderby=title&offset=20&item=1085

This is a great lesson thanks, Red.

Hutch82
06-16-2010, 01:19 PM
I often think that a great part of learning guitar is a mind game. Just the belief that you're getting a little better with these studies every time you do them seems to help a great deal and tend to help with focus and ease of movement. This of course applies to anything you practice, but requires honesty with one's self. Difficulties with the gauge of the strings and the wider neck are small problems that will take care of themselves with a positive outlook... "I think I can... I think I can". Those moments when it all comes together and "clicks" makes it all worth while. And the more often you do it, slowly and with a sense of deliberateness on each note, in time, the more often it "clicks". Sounds like to me your on the right track Hutch. Keep it up. : )

hey Nylon Whisperer thanks again for the positive vibes...I'm just about to do half an hour practice before tea time, seranade my missus with some nylon tones, that's how I'm selling it to her:bigsmile:
Liking the word deliberateness will incorporate that into light and slow...

herb do you have exercises you use for dexterity? And have you bourght that web cam yet?

H

slasner
06-16-2010, 03:36 PM
Today i uploaded another audio podcast lesson that is classical guitar oriented!! Guitabulary podcast on Itunes!!!:rasta:

herby
06-19-2010, 08:43 AM
hey Nylon Whisperer thanks again for the positive vibes...I'm just about to do half an hour practice before tea time, seranade my missus with some nylon tones, that's how I'm selling it to her:bigsmile:
Liking the word deliberateness will incorporate that into light and slow...

herb do you have exercises you use for dexterity? And have you bourght that web cam yet?

H

Hey Hutch, I like the word Deliberateness too when it comes to playing every note, chord or interval. You gotta be able to play it like you mean it and you can only by doing it slowly... even if you have to learn the movements out of time at first, with a true sense of ease of movement in both hands, until you're ready to add the beloved metronome. I like to practice measure by measure before I practice something all the way through. The attitude being that you can't play an entire piece until you can play the first measure well, with confidence...and again, deliberateness! And then the 2nd measure, the 3rd, etc. You see the teachers on TFTV playing with a sense of deliberateness in every lesson. The same is true no matter the style. In my mind guitar playing is guitar playing.

As for dexterity, I learned just about everything I know when I started playing the simple (which does not mean EASY) studies of Aguado, Carcassi, Sor, Giuliani and Tarrega. These guys had the kind of genius that allowed them to write studies that are very musical and still help you learn the techniques that you need to play classical guitar and you'll have pieces that will last you a lifetime. I still play a lot of them on gigs all the time. If you've ever practiced boring studies on guitar, you really appreciate good ones. All of these same guys wrote masterpieces for guitar too, but you can't learn them until you've gotten some experience with the simple ones first.

I've finally gotten myself a computer with a cam in it... now all I have to do is learn how to use the darn thing, which right now to me seems more daunting then playing guitar. Any advice welcome!

Hutch82
06-19-2010, 11:53 AM
Hey Hutch, I like the word Deliberateness too when it comes to playing every note, chord or interval. You gotta be able to play it like you mean it and you can only by doing it slowly... even if you have to learn the movements out of time at first, with a true sense of ease of movement in both hands, until you're ready to add the beloved metronome. I like to practice measure by measure before I practice something all the way through. The attitude being that you can't play an entire piece until you can play the first measure well, with confidence...and again, deliberateness! And then the 2nd measure, the 3rd, etc. You see the teachers on TFTV playing with a sense of deliberateness in every lesson. The same is true no matter the style. In my mind guitar playing is guitar playing.

As for dexterity, I learned just about everything I know when I started playing the simple (which does not mean EASY) studies of Aguado, Carcassi, Sor, Giuliani and Tarrega. These guys had the kind of genius that allowed them to write studies that are very musical and still help you learn the techniques that you need to play classical guitar and you'll have pieces that will last you a lifetime. I still play a lot of them on gigs all the time. If you've ever practiced boring studies on guitar, you really appreciate good ones. All of these same guys wrote masterpieces for guitar too, but you can't learn them until you've gotten some experience with the simple ones first.

I've finally gotten myself a computer with a cam in it... now all I have to do is learn how to use the darn thing, which right now to me seems more daunting then playing guitar. Any advice welcome!

I hope everyone one else is getting the benefit of your excellent advice herb I know I am... thanks man...will investigate Aguado, Carcassi, Sor, et al I've so much on this weekend not playing as much as I would like but soaking up as much as I can with reading and listening too.
Computer advice the Toob is your friend whatever you need to know some one as put something up there

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtZI0RSWjjA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6oEEp7Ny7o

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KZQuv16DedY&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSQ7dl8Zgrk&feature=related

there you go that should fry your brain for a while herb :)

H

herby
06-21-2010, 12:14 PM
Hutch, just wanted to thank you for taking the trouble to research and send me those links. I'm going to have to look these over a couple of more times but it looks like Skype is going to be the way to go, coupled with Paypal. This is a great idea and I may ask you at some point to be my guinea pig (minus the paypal part) to see if I can get it to work, that is if you're open to the idea.

In the meantime, if you have any trouble finding Aguado, Sor, etc studies, let me know and I'll see if I can help.

Thanks a bunch... Herb

Hutch82
06-21-2010, 05:15 PM
Hutch, just wanted to thank you for taking the trouble to research and send me those links. I'm going to have to look these over a couple of more times but it looks like Skype is going to be the way to go, coupled with Paypal. This is a great idea and I may ask you at some point to be my guinea pig (minus the paypal part) to see if I can get it to work, that is if you're open to the idea.

In the meantime, if you have any trouble finding Aguado, Sor, etc studies, let me know and I'll see if I can help.

Thanks a bunch... Herb

It's great to share and I learnt something too...and I'd be very happy to be a guinea pig herb...mmm that might mean I'd have to practice more :)
would make a good thread too get some other educators chipping in with how they reach their students with technology.
I had a bit of nylon time this evening with the Scott Tennant book...bottomless pit in there, the mantra is part of the regime now, thanks again. The practicing is definately relaxing time now I'm not beating myself up about being hero class anymore. Just being happy into guitar again after getting a bit outta love with it end of last year...

H

herby
06-22-2010, 01:07 PM
It's great to share and I learnt something too...and I'd be very happy to be a guinea pig herb...mmm that might mean I'd have to practice more :)
would make a good thread too get some other educators chipping in with how they reach their students with technology.
I had a bit of nylon time this evening with the Scott Tennant book...bottomless pit in there, the mantra is part of the regime now, thanks again. The practicing is definately relaxing time now I'm not beating myself up about being hero class anymore. Just being happy into guitar again after getting a bit outta love with it end of last year...

H
Your eagerness to share speaks well of you. You're volunteering to be a guinea pig speaks of your valor lol.

Very cool idea about the thread and the technology behind it all. It's surely one I'd follow.

Scott Tennant's book will certainly keep you busy and is very good but to me there's nothing like practicing a simple piece created to enhance technique. Maybe that's why Scott Tennant is Scott Tennant and I am me, but I have a book of Sor studies that I think may be very good for you. Loaned it to a student but should have it back tomorrow. Don't let me forget and I'll make some PDFs for you.

Hutch82
06-22-2010, 04:16 PM
...there's nothing like practicing a simple piece created to enhance technique.

that's weird I was doing some training today and used a similar premise of taking a bite size chunks to build skills ...like the sound of Sor muy espanol

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ft4BJPEKnSY

so .pdf's si por favor senor herb

H

herby
06-22-2010, 08:18 PM
that's weird I was doing some training today and used a similar premise of taking a bite size chunks to build skills

H
You're certainly on the right track practicing like that. The video is fantastic. That piece is #5 of the famous 20 Estudios (a little Spanish lingo there) for Guitar. It's not that difficult to play technically...(but not that easy either)... but to play it with the kind of control that Julian Bream displays is mind boggling. He is absolutely one of the greatest guitarists I've ever seen or more, heard. I went to a Bream concert in the early 70s and he was in his prime. It was, well... gobsmacking. He's no spring chicken in the vid you posted but he can still play a guitar piece.

These are excerpts of preludes by Villa Lobos, and show a little bit of what I'm talking about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbW4rYYKxhg

Hutch82
06-24-2010, 05:47 PM
These are excerpts of preludes by Villa Lobos, and show a little bit of (YOU KNOW) what I'm talking about:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SbW4rYYKxhg

Glad you've embraced culteral exchange with the use of the term "Gobsmacked" and versions of, herb because it is surely is the correct adjective for Julian Bream and Villa-Lobos. I'm resigned to file this in the never in my lifetime file...that I'll grasp any where close to...
in the mean time a VHS cassette dropped through my door, a Romero Lumbambo bossa course I picked up off ebay for 0.99 brand new that I'm finding very accessible (transfered the tape to computer)

H

herby
06-25-2010, 08:03 PM
Wow... I LOVE Romero Lumbambo's playing. He improvises as well as anyone I've ever heard. I'll be really curious to hear about what you think of it. Keep me up to date. I made some scans for you of Sor studies, but they are on a thumb drive that my GF has right now. I'll be sending them soon though. I think you'll like them a lot.

Hutch82
06-26-2010, 07:41 AM
Wow... I LOVE Romero Lumbambo's playing. He improvises as well as anyone I've ever heard. I'll be really curious to hear about what you think of it. Keep me up to date. I made some scans for you of Sor studies, but they are on a thumb drive that my GF has right now. I'll be sending them soon though. I think you'll like them a lot.

I've got some guitar time booked today gonna dig into Romero... first thing I got out of him was that my bossa rhythm in my right hand was slightly too busy, in what I perceived to be correct but actually different will apply the mantra and lock it in with a metronome. Will let you know on the course ...muchos gracias in advance for the Sor studies will try and investigate his repetoire aurally, cheers herbi-one ken-obi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pJcyyR-kJQ8&feature=related

H

herby
06-26-2010, 08:07 AM
That video was gorgeous Hutch thanks. I think I posted this one somewhere else here before but I can't resist... just in case you missed it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90Z-LGSwiFM&feature=related

Hutch82
06-26-2010, 08:23 AM
That video was gorgeous Hutch thanks. I think I posted this one somewhere else here before but I can't resist... just in case you missed it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90Z-LGSwiFM&feature=related

Extra terrestrials landed in Brazil also :wow: astonishing R/H :siffler: I should be practising before she who must be obeyed comes home lofl catch y later herb

H

Hutch82
06-26-2010, 06:42 PM
Ended up having 3 hrs nylon time today worked on some Romero Lumbambo bossa patterns. Been adopting herb's mantra "deliberate, light and slow" into my practise now. One thing came out of the session was a realization of losing some electric techniques, s'hard to verbalize but found fingering a voicing like Am with four fingers rather than 2nd finger and 3rd finger barre. And trying to get fingers up behind frets with light a pressure as possible to get a better cleaner tone.
And just trying to nail a good bossa rhythm...I had some fun :bigsmile:

H

herby
06-27-2010, 11:38 AM
Ended up having 3 hrs nylon time today worked on some Romero Lumbambo bossa patterns. Been adopting herb's mantra "deliberate, light and slow" into my practise now. One thing came out of the session was a realization of losing some electric techniques, s'hard to verbalize but found fingering a voicing like Am with four fingers rather than 2nd finger and 3rd finger barre. And trying to get fingers up behind frets with light a pressure as possible to get a better cleaner tone.
And just trying to nail a good bossa rhythm...I had some fun :bigsmile:

H

Sounds like a good day's work Hutch. I have a couple of pages of Sor studies ready to send as jpegs but not sure how or if I can do it via TF. Advice please!

Hutch82
06-27-2010, 12:29 PM
Sounds like a good day's work Hutch. I have a couple of pages of Sor studies ready to send as jpegs but not sure how or if I can do it via TF. Advice please!

Sent you a mail herb with zipping or sharing options, you d'man

H

Wolfboy1
06-27-2010, 01:09 PM
What a great series of posts you two have had while I've been on vacation. I'm jealous I wasn't here to participate. I used to play some H. Villa Lobos but not well and Fernando Sor is amazing as well. I think it is time for me to put my nylons front and center for a bit until Red calls me out to monitor his course. I will reread and watch the videos this week. My goal has been to learn some entire pieces and commit them to memory (which is getting harder to do:facepalm:). I think the one piece I want to eventually work up to learning is "The Clap" by Steve Howe. Not really in the classical ballpark you two are playing in but an impressive piece all the same.

But after watching this video again I think it may be beyond me:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YF1yFRrVPqU

Here is an exceptionally well done version at just a tad bit slower speed that gives me hope
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h7jujDE-4k&feature=related

It's going to take some months of practice before I even think of trying it but we will see in a year if I have tried.

Hutch82
06-27-2010, 02:14 PM
What a great series of posts you two have had while I've been on vacation. I'm jealous I wasn't here to participate. I used to play some H. Villa Lobos but not well and Fernando Sor is amazing as well. I think it is time for me to put my nylons front and center for a bit until Red calls me out to monitor his course. I will reread and watch the videos this week. My goal has been to learn some entire pieces and commit them to memory (which is getting harder to do:facepalm:). I think the one piece I want to eventually work up to learning is "The Clap" by Steve Howe. Not really in the classical ballpark you two are playing in but an impressive piece all the same.

But after watching this video again I think it may be beyond me:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YF1yFRrVPqU

Here is an exceptionally well done version at just a tad bit slower speed that gives me hope
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h7jujDE-4k&feature=related

It's going to take some months of practice before I even think of trying it but we will see in a year if I have tried.

That's the first time I've heard The Clap since I was at school in '73 or something that and Starshiptrooper was huge with some of my peers nice one WB...I'm amazed how this thread has evolved really I think I was like championing a kind of "understyle" with nylon on the forum, I haven't put my cheap Yam down since I've had it and herb's enthusiasum too has been brill and we need to tap into his skills. Been turned on to classical that I knew was there that I investigated in the early 80's but didn't think it was for me. But I hear Villa-Lobos,Sor and Tarrega and go :wow:
The bossa thing is what I really want to master because I just love that rhythm on nylon and just getting a handle on some of the changes and fingerings jumping off an electric for years is challenging enough. Just like the sound of just doing exercises even. But somethings coming and it's summer, I'm sitting in the garden with a beer playing nylon acoustic a lot... aaah

H

herby
06-28-2010, 10:54 AM
Welcome back Wolf. Hutch and I have been having a good ol' time. I've loved Steve Howe's The Clap since the first time I heard it as a teenager. I saw Yes back in the days when I liked to sit in the front row at a concert... must have been early to mid 70s. I was a huge Yes fan...guess I still am. I learned his Mood for a Day off an old LP after picking up the needle and putting it back down a LOT, but haven't played it in years. It's a beaut, too.

@ Hutch, I love playing Brazilian style but am first to admit that I'm a long ways from playing it like the people who grew up with it (namely, Brazilians I guess). I didn't really discover it until I was in my 20s (a long time ago). But whatever success I've had with it has come from first learning classical guitar RH technique to a degree. I don't think I could have gotten comfortable with it if I had started it before classical guitar, but that's me... don't let that stop you. I should also say that all of South America is a gold mine of guitar. Some of my other favorites are Venezuelan pieces by Lauro and others. Much of it is "classical" style but incorporates those Latin rhythms and harmonies that we love. Much like Villa Lobos. Here's one I've been working on for a few months:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YHkKo_ngfE

I discovered the guy in that vid a while back and think he has a real nice way with the nylon. He has a ton of stuff worth listening to on youtube.

Wolfboy1
06-28-2010, 04:05 PM
I have never hear that piece before, it's quite pretty. It looks like a solid intermediate heading toward Advanced piece?
Can you play it up to speed yet herby:rasta:

Hutch82
06-28-2010, 04:51 PM
Just subscribed to Per-Olov Kingren's Channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/AndanteLargo

what an amazing sweet tone he has will nose dive in there over coming weeks, noticed trouble clef subscibed on the list fan of him too. Thanks for sharing herb...

H

herby
06-29-2010, 11:09 AM
I have never hear that piece before, it's quite pretty. It looks like a solid intermediate heading toward Advanced piece?
Can you play it up to speed yet herby:rasta:

I'd say that was a pretty good description of the piece, Wolf. The metronome marking is 120 I think and I'm sure I've had it upwards of that a few times but I never practice it that way. I always practice everything slowly and constantly monitor myself for tension and at the same time listening for phrasings within the piece that I may have overlooked... or maybe better put, trying to grasp the music of it all. I'm a bit anal about that if you haven't picked up on it already from previous posts lol. The piece is quite beautiful played slowly by the way, so it's easy to enjoy practicing it slowly. Once I'm truly comfortable with a piece and have the motor memory locked and loaded, I need only get my head in the right zone and the piece just seems to come out almost as if I'm just an observer. The speed of it all just seems to be a by-product of slow easy practice. I once read in an interview with Al Dimeola that he never practiced for speed either, just ease of movement. I'm a long ways from playing like Al but the theory seems to be the same. The minute I start asking myself questions like "how fast can I play it?", I lose the zone and it all goes to hell. At the risk of sounding overly esoteric (or even like a nut-job), it's something that I allow to come over me rather than try to force.

More than you asked for sorry... just wondering if anyone else could relate.

herby
06-29-2010, 11:19 AM
Just subscribed to Per-Olov Kingren's Channel

http://www.youtube.com/user/AndanteLargo

what an amazing sweet tone he has will nose dive in there over coming weeks, noticed trouble clef subscibed on the list fan of him too. Thanks for sharing herb...

H

Good move Hutch, I'm a subscriber too. Here's another of his that I liked so much I stole it and learned it for myself:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tz1jnDe4gTE

Hutch82
10-24-2010, 03:35 PM
Out of the blue and thanks to subscribing to various artists on the Toob came the latest from troubleclef and a tune called Modinha...ah man this guy just floors me. Try his others if you haven't already

cvMYHmLCiF8&feature=uploademail


H

herby
10-26-2010, 09:38 AM
Nice Hutch... this guy shows a lot of control in this piece... I'll be looking at some of his others, thanks.

Hutch82
01-28-2011, 04:21 AM
More troubleclef for the nylon afficianados

w75oMGF7m3I&feature=uploademail

H

herby
01-28-2011, 08:23 AM
Wow Hutch.... you do come up with some good ones. Very sweet melody, rich harmonies, and a powerful climax that fades away into the impressionistic ether. It held my attention for the entire 6 minutes. What more could a guy ask for? Thanks for putting it up.

Wolfboy1
01-28-2011, 09:28 AM
Nice videos but herby that 's not what I would call a powerful climax, I was waiting for an uptempo swirling flourish of bravado instead it's more of a Debussy fade out...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Mer_(Debussy)

but good stuff none the less.

I seem to have lost track of this thread a bit but reading some of the posts I understand what you are saying herby. My problem is I have always had rock n roll prominate in my playing and have never seriously tried to just focus on the nylon side of the house. It's hard to be slow and methodical when so much of your playing was geared to flash. Face it this is probably the biggest reason I took up guitar in the first place:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3416/4624029065_455b57cd87.jpg
"the greatest guitar cartoon of all time"

One of these days I will mellow out and perfect my nylon playing but for now I appreciate the videos and insight into individual technique.

Hutch82
01-28-2011, 09:39 AM
so much of your playing was geared to flash. .


At your age lofl

H

herby
01-28-2011, 11:16 AM
Nice videos but herby that 's not what I would call a powerful climax, I was waiting for an uptempo swirling flourish of bravado instead it's more of a Debussy fade out..but good stuff none the less.

I seem to have lost track of this thread a bit but reading some of the posts I understand what you are saying herby. My problem is I have always had rock n roll prominate in my playing and have never seriously tried to just focus on the nylon side of the house. It's hard to be slow and methodical when so much of your playing was geared to flash. Face it this is probably the biggest reason I took up guitar in the first place:

"the greatest guitar cartoon of all time"

One of these days I will mellow out and perfect my nylon playing but for now I appreciate the videos and insight into individual technique.

Call me a fan of the DeBussy fade out I guess, Wolf. :yeah:. I tend towards the understated at times. (Cool wikipedia link by the way, thanks.) You hear something akin to this in rock 'n roll too sometimes too. Showing my age, but some of the tunes on "Dark Side of the Moon" come to mind.

Re the cartoon: that could be me in that one too. Isn't that why all of us who started as teenagers got into playing? :siffler:

herby
01-28-2011, 11:21 AM
Since I'm on this page anyway, I thought I'd throw in what Julian Bream (with tongue firmly in cheek) calls "a little light relief".
spUT-2tU2Yk

Wolfboy1
01-28-2011, 12:21 PM
Just outstanding!

herby
02-01-2011, 09:10 AM
I think so too Wolf. Bream has as much control over his playing and music as anybody I've ever heard. Thought y'all might have an interest in this one too. Bream interviewing flamenco great Paco Pena. Classical and flamenco. Two styles that are so close in technique and worlds apart in style. Flamenco players have always blown me away. Few of them ever bother to learn to read music. I think their training begins in the womb. That's got to be a huge advantage.

ucGwXyW0brI

herby
02-01-2011, 09:46 AM
While I was here anyway, I just watched a vid I hadn't seen before and thought I'd throw in. This is really cool vid especially considering the time period it was made. This is "The Julian Bream Duo". The one on the right the concert guitarist, and the one on the left evidently (judging by his get-up) his Las Vegas Showband counterpart:
zhFF6JwpvAo

Hutch82
02-22-2011, 05:32 AM
Just working and listening to this new upload from troubleclef a Steve Hackett tune from Voyage of the Acolyte and was transported back to '75 when I used to play the album late at night. The power of music and time travel

4fatjK0K_sk&feature=uploademail

H

herby
02-22-2011, 08:42 AM
Cool find Hutch... keep us up to date on how it's going... that's definitely playable and has some great RH exercises.

Wolfboy1
02-22-2011, 09:22 AM
Very nice!

A few chords in there would take some work for me but it is playable. This guy has some nice dynamics in his playing, a good sense for the pacing and intensity. Is there a transcription for that anywhere?

Wolfboy1
02-22-2011, 09:28 AM
Here's one tab, not quite complete:
http://www.fretplay.com/tabs/h/hackett_steve/star_of_sirius-tab.shtml

Here it is again, I think the same one:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/s/steve_hackett/star_of_sirius_tab.htm

Here is a list of steve Hackett tabs if you are interested:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?search_type=title&value=steve+Hackett

Hutch82
03-12-2011, 08:38 AM
This guy just knocks me over with his choices of material the gorgeous or gob smacking for herb, Luiza

fA0kxV639aU&feature=uploademail

H

herby
03-13-2011, 10:08 AM
This guy just knocks me over with his choices of material the gorgeous or gob smacking for herb, Luiza

I like this guy's playing a lot too, Oh Funky One. Great tune, well played. Thanks for the good find. :clapping:

Hutch82
10-08-2011, 11:37 AM
Lurvely piece of Bach from Tony

ErbWav1ESN8&feature=uploademail

And some good reading reading on his Blogspot too

http://http://tonyrclef.blogspot.com/ (http://http//tonyrclef.blogspot.com/)

H

Hutch82
04-07-2012, 12:52 PM
Discovered a Brazilian artist composer nylon guitarist Caetano Veloso and started working on one of his tunes Sozinho but investigating more of his catalog leads me to his gorgeous changes, and you think there is nothing out there to turn you on any more, wrong!!

Think herb might like this gentleman


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRawTjuRYd0&feature=related


H

herby
04-09-2012, 08:48 AM
Discovered a Brazilian artist composer nylon guitarist Caetano Veloso and started working on one of his tunes Sozinho but investigating more of his catalog leads me to his gorgeous changes, and you think there is nothing out there to turn you on any more, wrong!!

Think herb might like this gentleman

You know me so well Hutch! That's a beautiful tune with some really nice changes. I'm listening to some more of his stuff on youtube right now. He's a very sweet player and he's got quite a large vocal range too. Thanks for posting this one!

Hutch82
04-10-2012, 05:05 AM
Researching a Bossa technique came across these articles by Richard Boukas that are an interesting read to the background of Brazilian music

http://web.mac.com/rboukas/webpages/articles.html

and an amazing workshop performance from him


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rd_O8RsfHP4

H

herby
04-10-2012, 10:05 AM
Researching a Bossa technique came across these articles by Richard Boukas that are an interesting read to the background of Brazilian

Whoa... Richard B has a new fan in me Hutch. Great vid there.... looks easy now, eh? :facepalm:

Very cool link too. Thanks for both Sir H!

PosterBoy
04-11-2012, 07:00 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cnNlB0xq44s&feature=relmfu

herby
04-11-2012, 09:17 AM
Wow, that guy is a very good and rhythmic player Posterboy. I'm going to have to look up some more of his stuff. Very cool vid. Thanks for posting it.