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View Full Version : Okay - Why can't I find the D on my E string?



gadlaw
12-07-2009, 04:50 PM
I've got myself a BOSS TU-80 and when I try to find the D in my fat E string I get a 7b and nothing that looks anything like a D - which makes trying to tune up to Drop D tuning of D-A-D-G-B-E kind of a drag.

It initially comes up at 'Chromatic' tuning, I usually select it to 'Guitar' and can't find the D to save my life. On a whim, while looking at playing a bit of fingerstyle Norwegian Wood and really wanting to get it I left the tuner on 'Chromatic' and found that a new note came available as I fiddled with my E string - a d2 note - which sounds like a D note to me and when I tuned the string to that d2 note and played Norwegian Wood - it sounded like it was supposed to sound like.

What the heck is up with that all you guys who are musically smarter than me? (and anyone else who happens to be hanging around the Beginner's Hang)

:wow:

Bry50
12-07-2009, 05:13 PM
If the other strings are tuning properly use the d you already have and tune the low E string to it . I always mute the other strings when I'm tuning to limit interference . Not sure otherwise ?

jauen
12-07-2009, 05:31 PM
The D2 refers to the D note in the second octave above middle C on a piano.

Make sure the tuner's reference note is A-440. It's easy to accidentally change this on that tuner.

It's a great tuner BTW. Built-in metronome and all.

Try hitting a harmonic D at the twelfth fret and see if it "listens" to that.

wvgman
12-07-2009, 06:16 PM
That's good stuff to know about D2 being the D in the second octave from middle C, jauen.
:clapping:

rjbasque
12-07-2009, 06:34 PM
What the heck is up with that all you guys who are musically smarter than me? (and anyone else who happens to be hanging around the Beginner's Hang)
Nope not smarter, it's just a technology thing. I have the TU-70 myself, which I got as an upgrade from a tuning fork http://img3.musiciansfriend.com/dbase/pics/products/regular/6/2/6/250626.jpg So having tuned up the old fashioned way I just liked that the tuner defaulted to [Auto-Guitar]. If I got close to the right note, the needle would start to move.

Mine doesn't show any note names though. I did just poked it a bit and I can do b, bb, Open A, G, D, but doesn't seem to like going below the low E in standard tuning mode. To be honest I only used it for a couple of years until I got the Vamp2 headphone modeling thingy. That one just shows a note name and a + 0r -. I was already using this when I first tried any form of dropped or altered tunings. The TU-70 is now only used for intonation setups.

gadlaw
12-07-2009, 07:52 PM
See now I have another one, a gray one that's bumping around the house somewhere,- a KORG I think that I seemed to be able to find that D when trying to go all radical and try Drop D tuning. But this BOSS seems to give me the business. I've got one of those Intelli Tune tuners that clips on the head that's sitting in my wishlist for the next time I go to buy something at Amazon.

So that Chromatic d2 is not the D I'm looking for. Thanks Jauen. Humm. It's very frustrating and as I think I've mentioned - my ear isn't a good ear. I tried hitting the D string and tuning the E string to the harmonic but who am I kidding, I have no idea what that should sound like. :facepalm:

Leedelta
12-07-2009, 08:39 PM
The intelli tuner is excellent I was using it tonight at a jazz gig. The upright bass player was using one too.

Small enough for a gig bag and don't use any pedal space!!!

rjbasque
12-07-2009, 09:06 PM
The D2 refers to the D note in the second octave above middle C on a piano.


So that Chromatic d2 is not the D I'm looking for.
Actually that IS the note you are looking for. Jauen was just giving the "standard" description of how the note name is derived. The link below notes that the low E in standard tuning is the E2 so therefore the D below that would be the D2. Note: the numerics change on the C. Two half steps down is the C2 then a single halfstep below that is the B1

http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/211.web.stuff/billington/main.htm

As far as having a "dead" ear. I always thought so myself. I'm not great yet, but I found that if I always tune up and try to always play in tune. I've found that I can sense out of tune now. Studies have shown that almost everyone has "perfect" pitch, it's just a matter of practice and learning it. Have someone play the notes in a major scale. Then repeat it with one note wrong, almost EVERYONE will catch it.

gadlaw
12-07-2009, 09:43 PM
Aha! Okay, when I try to tune it to d2 on Chromatic I can hit it. I flip it over to the Guitar tuning and hit the same note and it sits over at the far left of the meter and says 6E with the little red light on the little b thing. Well, the more you know. :siffler:

Goerman
12-12-2009, 01:40 AM
I think Gad because in that mode it references the strings and as D is lower than E, it simply reads as your 6th string is flat (in this case right off its chart!). If you are tuning to anything other than standard, use the chromatic mode.

gadlaw
12-12-2009, 11:06 AM
I think Gad because in that mode it references the strings and as D is lower than E, it simply reads as your 6th string is flat (in this case right off its chart!). If you are tuning to anything other than standard, use the chromatic mode.

Excellent advice. I've been reading the reviews of the various tuners and I find that a lot of them have trouble with the low E string and after hearing everyone discuss I can understand what's going on with it. Low E string tuning problems seems to be a common difficulty. :rasta:

jimiclaptoncarl
12-12-2009, 01:29 PM
The D2 refers to the D note in the second octave above middle C on a piano.


Hey Jauen, I'm curious about the D2; how do you know that it's in the second octave above middle C on a piano?

Why I'm asking is because, middle C is known as C4, so shouldn't the D be referred D5?

Or is this not referring to that, just for easier use with the tuner? :rasta:

Thanks

wvgman
12-12-2009, 05:21 PM
Woah!!! I thought C4 was an explosive!!!:facepalm:

murrayatuptown
12-13-2009, 12:51 AM
You can find charts on the web numbering the piano keys and their frequency.

I had to resort to that after breaking 4 or 5 high E's setting up my daughter's guitar (as a not-yet player myself)...the tuner must have been in the key of F instead of C, as I had the low E tuned to A, the A was D, the D was G, etc. The tremelo kept creeping up, the 10's felt like 12-s, still never realized what was going on until I checked the tuner against a piano...pretty embarrassing, but so stupid it's worth sharing...at least I can still laugh at it!

Mu

gadlaw
12-13-2009, 12:58 AM
Hey Murry, it's not stupid as long as we realize somebody is googling this very question and finding themselves here with answers to the same questions. I often say to myself, man do I sound stupid, but then you know, it's only stupid when you don't ask the questions and learn the answers. And I know if I learned something then the other guy lurking just might have learned something as well. Thanks for the info Murray. :clapping: