Blues Jam Survival Guide

Blues Jam Survival Guide

The full Blues Jam Survival Guide course is packed with over 115 tips, 75 essential licks, 43 practice rhythm tracks, and tons of other valuable insight designed for the practicing guitarist and is now available for instant download.

Research and surveys say that glossophobia, more commonly known as the fear of public speaking, ranks as the #1 phobia ahead of death, spiders, heights and dozens of other common fears. The researchers obviously haven’t polled a lot of musicians because nothing strikes fear in the heart of a practicing guitar player more than jumping up on the stage and performing at their local blues jam.

A quick Google will reveal hundreds of books, courses and seminars for conquering the fear of public speaking but you’ll find very little that prepares you and helps you overcome the fear of participating in a public blues jam. And that’s precisely why we asked Jeff Scheetz to research and author the Blues Jam Survival Guide for TrueFire members and students.

Producer, recording artist and instructor extraordinaire, Scheetz has an extensive background as founder and leader of several highly popular blues and blues-rock jam bands. One of the most sought after instructors by students and professionals alike, Scheetz is eminently qualified to guide your blues jam aspirations. Here are his a selection of his valuable tips (all of Jeff’s tips can be found in his full Blues Jam Survival Guide course):

1. Have a Good Attitude

Jam night etiquette is something everyone should be aware of. It is mostly simple things like having a good attitude, be prepared, paying attention, supporting the other jammers. These are simple little things that make a huge difference.

2. Pay Attention

Communication is key when jamming, especially when you are playing with people you don’t know. So make sure you are always looking at the other players – to start with, as soon as you get plugged in, make eye contact with the other guys. Then while in the middle of the song, be watching the other guys to see who should take what solo when etc.

3. Prepare Your Songs

Make sure you know the key the song is in that you are going to jam on. Also, make sure you are doing the same “version” of the song that the band is doing. When practicing your songs at home, play with your guitar on a strap, with you standing up, just like you would on stage.

4. Know the Rules

Each jam night is run a little different. It is good to know the “pace” of the jam night – if it goes really fast, or if it is more casual. The best thing you can do to learn this is to go out to the jam night for a couple of weeks BEFORE you even take your guitar with you. Just go there to check it out and see how it all flows. This will also let you know if you need to bring your own instrument or use theirs, also see what songs would be good to play.

5. Seek Out the Jam Host

Sometimes you just need a push. The other guys at a jam night are a great help in this area. Find the jam host and let them know you are wanting to get up and jam, and be sure and let him know if it is your first time.

6. Don’t Be Scared!

Stage fright can be a very real fear for some people. One thing that will help you is to realize you are among friends and people who are very forgiving. Jam nights are a GREAT place to get up on stage for the first time! Remember, if you really prepare then when you get up there it will all go smooth, so “over” practice the songs you are going to do until you have them down cold.

The full Blues Jam Survival Guide course is packed with over 115 tips, 75 essential licks, 43 practice rhythm tracks, and tons of other valuable insight designed for the practicing guitarist and is now available for instant download.